tattoo


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tat·too

(ta-tū'),
1. A deliberate decorative implanting or injecting of indelible pigments into the skin or the tinctorial effect of accidental implantation.
2. To produce such an effect. The procedure, historically and geographically widespread, is associated with risks of infection. Removal is difficult, with pulsed laser treatment offering low risks of scarring.
[Tahiti, tatu]

tattoo

[tato̅o̅′]
Etymology: Tahitian, tatau, marks
a permanent coloration of the skin by the introduction of foreign pigment. A tattoo may be created deliberately or may accidentally occur when a bit of graphite from a broken pencil point is embedded in the skin. Laser is preferred for removal of tattoos, although small tattoos can be removed by surgical excision. tattoo, v.
Dermatology A permanent form of cutaneous decoration that may range from simple, often small dark-coloured insignias, messages or symbols performed by amateurs in prison, to elaborate multi-coloured animals, objects or scenes performed by professional, skilled workers under sterile conditions
Complications Infection, HBV, HCV transmission, allergic reaction to dyes, disfigurement, innoculation tuberculosis
Forensics An abnormal mark etched into tissue

tattoo

Dermatology A permanent form of cutaneous decoration that may range from simple, often small dark-colored insignias, messages or symbols performed by amateurs in prison, to elaborate multi-colored animals, objects or scenes performed by more skilled workers under relatively sterile conditions; up to 25% of college-aged persons have tattoos; persons with tattoos have a 7-fold ↑ risk of HCV infection. See Laser surgery. Cf Tattooing Forensic pathology An abnormal mark etched into tissue. See Powder tattoo.

tat·too

(ta-tū')
1. A deliberate decorative implanting or injecting of indelible pigments into the skin or the tinctorial effect of accidental implantation.
2. To produce such an effect.
3. Synonym(s): amalgam tattoo.
[Tahiti, tatu]

tattoo

References in periodicals archive ?
In eyeball tattoos - also referred to as scleral tattoos - needles inject ink into the whites of a person's eyes to permanently dye it a different colour.
Many pilgrims who returned another time, asked for the date of that year to be added to the tattoo.
Hence, a fresh skin for a fresh tattoo is always advisable to tattoo freaks," Goyat concluded.
The majority of them (68%, 28/41) would never consider a tattoo in the future, whereas 15% (6/41) considered it and 17% (7/41) said they might.
In 70s and 80s, tattoos saw a change in its trend; people got more inclined towards styles like Chicano and tribal.
In most of the prisons, one can, as well, notice that the maintenance of tattoo instruments is very poor, if not even entirely missing.
Individuals with concerns or questions related to tattoos and permanent make-up or tattooing can consult their healthcare providers.
And now he has decided to commemorate both occasions with tattoos.
You could say there are a number of morals to the Tattoo Fixers story - but why do the fix-ees often opt for their new tattoos to be so big?
In addition to being less likely to have a tattoo, Honors students with tattoos were much more likely to have mulled over the decision for at least a year (75% versus 19% of non-Honors students) and none had acquired a tattoo on impulse (versus 13% of non-Honors students) (p=.
During the latest series of Channel 4 reality documentary Tattoo Fixers, the 25-year-old from Conwy has been faced with everything from the crude and the awkward to the downright ridiculous.
The survey, conducted by researchers at Tulane University, New Orleans, found that almost 23% had experienced pruritus at the tattoo site more than a month after being tattooed.