taste

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taste

 [tāst]
the sensation caused by the contact of soluble substances with the tongue; the cranial nerves conducting impulses relating to taste are the facial nerve for the anterior part of the tongue and the glossopharyngeal nerve for the posterior part. Other senses, such as smell and touch, also play important roles in the experience commonly thought of as tasting.



The organs of taste are the taste buds, bundles of slender cells with hairlike branches that are packed together in groups that form the projections called papillae at various places on the tongue. When a substance is introduced into the mouth, its molecules enter the pores of the papillae and stimulate the taste buds directly. In order to do this, the substance has to be dissolved in liquid. If it is not liquid when it enters the mouth, then it melts or is chewed and becomes mixed with saliva.

There are four basic tastes: sweet, salt, sour, and bitter. Sometimes alkaline and metallic are also included as basic tastes. All other tastes are combinations of these. The taste buds are specialized, and each responds only to the kind of basic taste that is its specialty. The sweet and salt taste buds are most numerous on the tip and front part of the tongue, sour taste buds are mainly along the edges, and bitterness is tasted at the back of the tongue. Bitter-sweet substances are tasted in two stages, first sweet, then bitter. The solid center of the tongue's surface has very few taste buds.

taste

(tāst),
1. To perceive through the gustatory system.
2. The sensation produced by a suitable stimulus applied to the taste buds.
[It. tastare; L. tango, to touch]

taste

(tāst)
1. the sense effected by the gustatory receptors in the tongue. Four qualities are distinguished: sweet, sour, salty, and bitter.
2. the act of perceiving by this sense.

taste

(tāst)
n.
1. The sense that distinguishes the sweet, sour, salty, and bitter qualities of dissolved substances in contact with the taste buds on the tongue.
2. This sense in combination with the senses of smell and touch, which together receive a sensation of a substance in the mouth.
3. The sensation of sweet, sour, salty, or bitter qualities produced by or as if by a substance placed in the mouth.
v.
1. To distinguish flavors in the mouth.
2. To have a distinct flavor.

taste

Etymology: ME, tasten
the sense of perceiving different flavors in soluble substances that contact the tongue and trigger nerve impulses to special taste centers in the cortex and thalamus of the brain. The four basic traditional tastes are sweet, salty, sour, and bitter. The front of the tongue is most sensitive to salty and sweet substances; the sides of the tongue are most sensitive to sour substances; and the back of the tongue is most sensitive to bitter substances. The middle of the tongue produces virtually no taste sensation. Chemoreceptor cells in the taste buds of the tongue detect different substances. Adults have about 9000 taste buds, most of them situated on the upper surface of the tongue. The sense of taste is intricately linked with the sense of smell, and taste discrimination is very complex. Many experts believe the capacity to perceive different tastes involves a synthesis of chemoreactive nerve impulses and coordinating brain processes that are still not completely understood.
enlarge picture
Taste regions of the tongue

taste

(tāst)
1. To perceive through the medium of the gustatory nerves.
2. The sensation produced by a suitable stimulus applied to the gustatory nerve endings in the tongue.
[It. tastare; L. tango, to touch]

taste

One of the five special senses. Taste is mediated by specialized nerve endings on the tongue called taste buds. These can distinguish only sweet, salt, sour and bitter, but, in combination with the wide range of perceptible smells, allows an almost infinite number of flavours to be experienced.

taste

(tāst)
1. To perceive through gustatory system.
2. Sensation produced by a suitable stimulus applied to taste buds.
[It. tastare; L. tango, to touch]

taste,

n the sense of perceiving different flavors in soluble substances that contact the tongue and trigger nerve impulses to special taste centers in the cortex and the thalamus of the brain. The four basic traditional tastes are sweet, salty, sour, and bitter.
taste bud,
n any one of many peripheral taste organs distributed over the tongue and the roof of the oral cavity. See also lingual papillae.
Enlarge picture
Taste bud.
taste enhancers,
n.pl food additives that have little or no flavor of their own but when added to food bring out the taste of certain foods. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the most common flavor or taste enhancer.

taste

the peculiar sensation caused by the contact of soluble substances with the tongue; the sense effected by the tongue, the gustatory and other nerves, and the gustatory center.
There are four basic tastes: sweet, salt, sour and bitter. Sometimes alkaline and metallic are also included as basic tastes. All other tastes are combinations of these. The taste buds are specialized, and each responds only to the kind of basic taste that is its specialty. The location of and the number of taste buds varies between animal species.
Other senses, including smell and touch, also play an important role in tasting.

taste bud, taste organ
the organ of taste; spherical nests of cells embedded in the mucosa of the mouth and tongue are composed of supporting and gustatory cells. The gustatory cells have a delicate, hairlike process which protrudes from the peripheral surface of the cell. Substances must be in solution to be tasted, solids must be chewed and mixed with saliva.
conditioned taste aversion
animals have been shown to develop aversions to foods associated with illness or other adverse experiences.
conditioned taste preference
theoretically, the reverse of conditioned taste aversion, which is a naturally occurring phenomenon; it is not widely accepted that animals will associate recovery from illness with a specific taste or food.
taste pore
opening from the exterior to a taste bud.
taste receptor
one of the three types of cell in a taste bud; called also gustatory cells.

Patient discussion about taste

Q. How you all manage with the taste of the Chinese medicine? Insomnia is severe in me and the allopathic medicines were not able to control it. On my friends advice I met Chinese Medical Practitioner. He has prescribed me some herbal medicines which are bitter in taste. I am fed up with the taste of the medicine that I am not comfortable having it next time. How you all manage with the taste of the Chinese medicine?

A. The benefit of Chinese medicine is good and you must have them. You can take honey after you take your medicines. This can bring back your taste. I am also taking Chinese herbal medicines for my nervous problem. They are very bitter. To reduce on their bitter taste I take honey or sometimes sugar cubes. Taking honey makes me feel good from the bitter taste of these medicines and taking these medicines helps me in getting better from my nervous problem.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gme608gROYo&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/vGme608gROYo_chinese_herbal_medicine_insomnia_anxiety?q=chinese%20medicine%20wi&feature=player_embedded

Q. i am allergic to a milk products.what are my other options with out giving up the taste and the nutrition?

A. try cutting down on your intake of dairy products first, to see if that helps, if not try soy milk,i"m also allergic to milk i can drink about 8 ounces every 8 hours and it doesnt mess with me too bad,and i love milk.

Q. i am allergic to a milk products.what are my other options with out giving up the taste and the nutrition?

A. agree with dominic's answer. or you can try soya milk as the substitution.

More discussions about taste
References in periodicals archive ?
The most trifling exhibit, displayed alongside woodcuts by Duer and the harrowing beauty of a Man of Sorrows, possibly by an associate of Pisanello, is, in that context, not merely intrusive but tastelessly frivolous: a quasi-religious toy consisting of scenes, swinging on hinges, of the Passion; all thought up by a Netherlandish inventor-artist, of little accomplishment in either field, to sell to a Spanish grandee.
Whatever snippet of literary culture exists, it mostly belongs to somebody expert in building fences to keep outsiders out; nothing is more tastelessly exclusive than certain Manhattan literary cliques.
Sicily has left her isolation and come into contact with the Italian continent, and what is more important, over the last few years, the great land masses of North America and Argentina; she has quit with her old styles, so beautiful and characteristic, appropriate and lasting, but expensive, and has taken on the insipid anti-aesthetical modern fashions, extraneous to all traditions in the region, tastelessly international, but fashionable and a good value.
Our once-beautiful farmscapes have nearly all vanished under the earthmovers, replaced by developers' overpriced, oversized, tastelessly ostentatious dwellings.
And as if in compensation for her successes (which are tastelessly out of place in a narrative about depression), she depicts the pain and boredom of uninspired and self-absented sexuality.
Baronov, who dances with some finesse, tastelessly left his Odile to take her bows by herself after the third act adagio while he made for the wings to prepare for his solo.
The family's house sits in a white suburb of Johannesburg, created during the riffles and tastelessly and cruelly named "Triomf" after the black residents had been moved out and their houses destroyed.
A group of Air Force veterans have seen a copy of the proposal for the show and are "feeling nuked," as Hugh Sidey tastelessly put it in Time magazine not long ago.
Sometimes hilarious, often tastelessly crude, but there's an underlying sweetness.
Many felt it had a tastelessly insidious tone, encouraging a subconscious sneer at people whose lives had become drug-addled train wrecks and, thanks to warts-and-all editing, shorthand examples of social exclusion, unemployment, deprivation and of working-class pride gone to seed.
And because they're owned and driven by sensible types, you're unlikely to find them trashed, abused or tastelessly modded.
This wedding wasn't wacky in the crazy, silly, deliberately, tastelessly odd sense of the word but on page 12, Rin Simpson, this week's Editor At Large while I'm sunning myself in Costa Del Hengoed for a week, looks at a whole raft of Wacky Welsh Weddings filmed for ITV1 Wales as part of a series with the same name.