tarsal bone


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Related to tarsal bone: carpal bone, Metatarsal bone

tarsal bone

n.
Any of the seven bones of the tarsus.

tarsal bone

One of the seven bones of the ankle, hind-foot, and midfoot, consisting of the talus, calcaneus, navicular, cuboid, and three cuneiform bones.
See also: bone

tarsal bone

or

tarsus the bone of the hind limb of

TETRAPODS that articulates with the TIBIA and FIBULA proximally and with the METATARSALS distally. see PENTADACTYL LIMB.
References in periodicals archive ?
(7-9) The duplication of cuneiform tarsal bones is also seen.
The largest of three swelling is situated anterio-internally at the level of the inner lip of trochlea of the astragalus and the two smaller swellings located one on the either side of the posterior surface of the hock joint at the junction of the tibial tarsal and fibular tarsal bones. These swellings vary in size in different cases, when pressure is exerted on any of the swellings it will cause an increase in size of other two swellings (Venugopalan, 2009).
Pond Neptune was yesterday undergoing a second operation to repair the central tarsal bone in his hock, the shattered bone requiring pinning at five separate points.
However in younger group less tarsal bone deformity was observed than in older groups.
Adjacent tarsal bone shows marrow edema and subtle enhancement on contrast study.
Patil et al studied 12 CHS of the bones of the feet, of which 4 tumours affected the tarsal bones and the rest involved the short tubular bones.11 Ogose et al reviewed 163 CHS located in the phalangeal, (meta) carpal, and (meta) tarsal bones of the hands (n=88) and feet (n=75) and suggested that these tumours have the potential to be fatal.
Bilateral extra tarsal bones in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: the fourth cuneiform bones.
He had bone technetium scan (TC-99), there is intense symmetrical radiotracer uptake seen involving the distal 2/3rd of both femoral bones, whole tibial bones, mid segment of humeral shafts, both ulnar and radial bones as well as tarsal bones bilaterally.
(1,3) The preferred sites of radiological involvement include: the phalanges (100%), carpal bones (97.4%), metacarpals (92.5%), feet phalanges (87.2%), metatarsals (84.4%), tarsal bones (84.6%), pelvis (74.4%), femur (74.4%), radius (66.7%), ulna (66.7%), sacrum (58.9%), humerus (28.2%), tibia (20.5%), and fibula (2.8%).
The cartilaginous tarsal bones are in extreme positions of adduction, inversion and flexion while the talus is severely plantar flexed; its head is wedge-shaped and the neck is plantarly and medially deflected.
But in 2016 I suffered a stress fracture to my left navicular, one the tarsal bones in the ankle.