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Related to tars: interstellar, tarsus

tar

 [tahr]
a dark brown or black viscid liquid from the wood of various species of pine, or found as a by-product of the destructive distillation of bituminous coal (see coal tar). It is a complex mixture, the source of organic substances such as cresol, creosol, naphthalene, paraffin, phenol, and toluene. Formerly used as an oral medication in treatment of various conditions, it has been found to be toxic and carcinogenic and now has only limited topical use in certain skin diseases.
coal tar a by-product obtained in destructive distillation of bituminous coal; if its fumes are inhaled or if it is ingested in its natural state, it is toxic and carcinogenic. A preparation is used in ointment or solution in treatment of eczema and psoriasis.

TAR

Acronym for thrombocytopenia and absent radius. See: thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome.

tar

(tahr),
A thick, semisolid, blackish brown mass, of complex hydrocarbon composition, obtained by destructive distillation of carbonaceous materials. For individual tars, see specific names.

tar

(tahr) a dark-brown or black, viscid liquid obtained from various species of pine or from bituminous coal (coal t.). It is used for topical treatment of skin conditions, including eczema, psoriasis, and dandruff, but is toxic and carcinogenic by inhalation or ingestion.

tar

(tär)
n.
1. A dark, oily, viscous material, consisting mainly of hydrocarbons, produced by the destructive distillation of organic substances such as wood, coal, or peat.
2. See coal tar.
3. A solid residue of tobacco smoke containing byproducts of combustion.

tar

[tär]
Etymology: AS, teoru
a dark, viscid organic mixture produced by the distillation of coal, wood, or vegetable matter. Some forms of tar are used to treat eczema and other skin disorders.

TAR

Abbreviation for thrombocytopenia and absent radius.
See: thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome

tar

a dark-brown or black, viscid liquid obtained from various species of pine or from bituminous coal. See also wood tar derivatives.

coal tar
coal tar pitch
tar derivatives
include phenol (carbolic acid), cresols, creosote, all potent poisons. See also wood tar derivatives.
hot tar
a cause of burns in dogs and cats, usually made more severe because it sticks to the skin.
juniper tar
a volatile oil obtained from wood of Juniperus oxycedrus; used topically in the treatment of skin disease.
pine tar
a product of destructive distillation of the wood of various pine trees; used as a rubefacient and treatment for skin disease.
tar pitch
Stockholm tar
References in periodicals archive ?
An important advantage of coal tar is its "cold flow" characteristics, which allows it to self-heal small fractures before more serious damage can occur.
Use traditional hot-applied coal tar pitch with either organic or inorganic reinforcement membranes (typically requires a professional roofing contractor).
Enu (editors), Occurrence, utilization and economic of Nigerian tar sands:A workshop held in Ogun State University Ago-Iwoye, Nigeria on 29-31 May, 1990.
Textural and occurrence of tar sands in Nigeria In: B.
Clarke focuses more at the federal level, where he describes the efforts of the Harper team, centred around the ultra-conservative "Calgary School" at University of Calgary's political science department, to build a "firewall" around the tar sands, thereby ensuring that no environmental factors--like the Kyoto Protocol--could limit their relentless expansion.
Inspired by the leftist Latin American energy sovereignty initiatives in Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador and Brazil, Clarke proposes a "Canada first" program of economic planning and energy nationalism, which would involve phasing out the tar sands and providing a "just transition" for energy workers.
Most tar sands production takes place in vast open-pit mines, some as large as 150 square kilometers and as deep as 90 meters.
Some American refineries, primarily in the Midwest and the Rocky Mountain region, already accept some synthetic crude oil from the tar sands.