taro

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taro

colocasiaesculenta, xanthosoma spp.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sugarcane farmers at Ingham (1987 survey) and near Edmonton (1992 survey) reported that wild taros were more abundant in the lowlands when fewer swamps had been drained and cleared for sugarcane cultivation.
During my own field work, I did not observe symptoms of any viruses among wild taros in Queensland, but this does not exclude the possibility that symptomless strains of virus were present.
5), despite the fact that wildtype and domesticated taros and other species of Colocasia are found in Northeast India and adjacent areas (Matthews 1991, 1995, 1997).
There might also have been an earlier dispersal eastward, on cultivated taros carried from Southeast Asia and/or New Guinea, into Micronesia and possibly as far as Hawaii.
These authors also reported very little genetic diversity among Polynesian taros, and suggested that Polynesian taros are derived from the larger Melanesian gene pool.
Matthews (1997) reported that wildtype taros exist in both stable and unstable habitats.
This is intriguing because different patterns of ribosomal DNA were previously found in wildtype taros from Western Australia, Northern Territory, and Queensland (Matthews and Terauchi 1994).
The present observations are also significant for agricultural ecology: the abundance and wide geographical range of Tarophagus in Queensland suggests that taro bobone virus, or similar insect-transmitted viruses, could spread quickly among wild and/or cultivated taros, if the viruses are introduced.
In this approach to the history of taro I am crossing disciplinary boundaries, just as I did during 1985 to 1990 as a student of Doug Yen, in the Department of Prehistory headed by Jack Golson, at the Australian National University (ANU).
The taro planthopper genus, Tarophagus, has three recognised species, and these are considered important insect pests on taro.
The possibility of transoceanic migration by the taro planthopper has not been investigated.
The known range of the genus Tarophagus is tropical to subtropical, with no reports from northern Japan or from New Zealand, at the northern and southern limits of cultivated taro in Asia and the Pacific.