target

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target

 [tahr´get]
1. an object or area toward which something is directed.
2. the area of the anode of an x-ray tube where the electron beam collides, causing the emission of x-rays.
3. a cell or organ that is affected by a particular agent, such as a hormone or drug.
target (omaha) in the omaha system, on the second level of the intervention scheme, any of the 62 objects of nursing interventions; the target serves to further describe an intervention. See also target definition.

tar·get

(tar'gĕt),
1. An object fixed as goal or point of examination.
See also: x-ray.
2. In the ophthalmometer, the mire.
See also: x-ray.
3.
See also: x-ray. Synonym(s): target organ
4. Anode of an x-ray tube.
See also: x-ray.
[It. targhetta, a small shield]

target

(tär′gĭt)
n.
1. A usually metal part in an x-ray tube on which a beam of electrons is focused and from which x-rays are emitted.
2. Biochemistry A molecule or molecular structure, such as a protein or a nucleic acid, that a drug or other compound interacts with and modulates the activity of.
tr.v. tar·geted, tar·geting, tar·gets
Biochemistry To interact with as a target: drugs that target estrogen receptors.

tar′get·a·ble (-gĭ-tə-bəl) adj.

TARGET

Cardiology
Do Tirofiban And ReoPro Give similar Efficacy Trial. A trial comparing safety and efficacy of abciximab/ReoPro and tirofiban/Aggrastat in the context of stent placement/percutaneous coronary intervention.

Conclusion
Endpoints: death, acute myocardial infarction (MI), urgent revascularisation occurred in 7.6% of tirofiban patients vs 6.0% of abciximab patients.

Rheumatology
Therapeutic Arthritis Research & Gastrointestinal Event Trial. A trial comparing the GI safety of Prexige (lumiracoxib) with ibuprofen and naproxen; a secondary endpoint was cardiovascular safety.

Conclusion
The primary endpoint, including incidence of MI, did not differ between lumiracoxib and either ibuprofen or naproxen, irrespective of aspirin use.

target

adjective Pertaining to a lesion or radiologic finding in which there are ≥ 3 relatively well-circumscribed, concentrically arranged annular patterns or radiodensities noun Imaging The molecular defect that is examined in molecular imaging. See CT/PET, Molecular imaging. Cf Probe.

tar·get

(tahr'gĕt)
1. An object fixed as a goal or point of examination.
2. In the ophthalmometer, the mire.
3. Synonym(s): target organ.
4. Anode of an x-ray tube.
See also: x-ray
5. In molecular diagnostic assays, the nucleic acid species being studied. The target is single-stranded and complementary to primers and/or probes.
[It. targhetta, a small shield]

target 

A pattern or an object of fixation such as a red dot or an optotype. See optotype.

tar·get

(tahr'gĕt)
1. An object fixed as goal or point of examination.
2. Anode of an x-ray tube.
[It. targhetta, a small shield]

Patient discussion about target

Q. Does good and healthy diet helps in achieving the target besides regular exercises? I am planning to join a gym to have a good physique, especially to get six pack abs. I think I need to work hard to develop muscles. I have kept my targets for a year to get them. My instructor has told me that he will guide me to make a really good looking abs. Does good and healthy diet helps in achieving the target besides regular exercises?

A. My experiences is that I missed to have a right diet and I lost my strength in the mid. This made me weak. And I lost all muscles very quickly. My targets were not to built abs but weight reduction. I stopped having one meal. I got slim but with lost energy. To make things worse I was having beverages. I did not notice that my health has deteriorated to a great extent. This was due to the passion to lose weight. So you keep your targets with low passion and with flexibility. Keep taking good diet and go slow and steady.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZGgeGHU1Bs&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/vXZGgeGHU1Bs_nutrient_density_key_good?q=diet%20good&feature=player_embedded

More discussions about target
References in periodicals archive ?
Target symptoms and responses to treatment of those target symptoms should be documented during regularly scheduled visits.
Many patients will have only partial remission of target symptoms. Therefore, increasing the dose or switching to an alternative agent may be necessary.
-- The decision to use medications in autistic children should be based on identifying target symptoms known to be amenable to medication and if symptoms are severe enough to interfere with functioning, Dr.
'At around 4 or 5 years, we start seeing the emergence of target symptoms for which they may be helpful," said Dr.
Teach patients to self-monitor changes and improvements in target symptoms. Engaging patients in a system of self-monitoring improves their chances of achieving successful treatment outcomes.
The average clinician makes up his mind within minutes of laying his eyes on the patient as to whether he is down in the dumps, panicking, crazy, or all over the place (bipolar) and in which proportions--for these are the only target symptoms for which he has medicines.
Approving new drugs for target symptoms rather than a DSM diagnosis might eliminate the often deplored--yet necessary--practice referred to as "off-label" pharmacotherapy.
Set clearcut baselines, target symptoms, and outcome measures.
When prescribing for a treatment-resistant schizophrenia patient, identify specific target symptoms to better inform medication selection--especially for symptoms that the patient feels are important.
The choice of drug, therefore, should depend on the patient's target symptoms. If the patient's target symptom is mood lability, for example, a mood stabilizer would be the best choice.
Weiden recommended that when considering adding medications to an antipsychotic for a schizophrenia patient with persistent symptoms, first give full trials of a single drug at the high end of the therapeutic dose and establish well-defined target symptoms before adding a new medication.
But some medications have proven to be useful in treating target symptoms, such as hyperactivity, tantrums, aggression, self-injury, and anxiety, he added.