target organ


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organ

 [or´gan]
accessory digestive o's (accessory o's of digestive system) organs and structures not part of the alimentary canal that aid in digestion; they include the teeth, salivary glands, liver, gallbladder, and pancreas.
organ of Corti the organ lying against the basilar membrane in the cochlear duct, containing special sensory receptors for hearing, and consisting of neuroepithelial hair cells and several types of supporting cells.
effector organ a muscle or gland that contracts or secretes, respectively, in direct response to nerve impulses.
enamel organ a process of epithelium forming a cap over a dental papilla and developing into the enamel.
end organ end-organ.
Golgi tendon organ any of the mechanoreceptors arranged in series with muscle in the tendons of mammalian muscles, being the receptor for stimuli responsible for the lengthening reaction.
sense o's (sensory o's) organs that receive stimuli that give rise to sensations, i.e., organs that translate certain forms of energy into nerve impulses that are perceived as special sensations.
spiral organ organ of Corti.
target organ the organ affected by a particular hormone.
vestigial organ an undeveloped organ that, in the embryo or in some remote ancestor, was well developed and functional.
o's of Zuckerkandl para-aortic bodies.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tar·get or·gan

a tissue or organ on which a hormone exerts its action; generally, a tissue or organ with appropriate receptors for a hormone.
Synonym(s): target (3)
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

target organ

Endocrinology A specific organ that a particular hormone affects
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tar·get or·gan

(tahr'gĕt ōr'găn)
A tissue or organ on which a hormone exerts its action; generally, a tissue or organ with appropriate receptors for a hormone.
Synonym(s): target (3) .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

tar·get or·gan

(tahr'gĕt ōr'găn)
Tissue or organ on which a hormone exerts its action.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Data collected included demographic data, nutritional status, causes of HPT, HIV status, presence of target organ damage and hypertensive crisis and its treatment.
Among the remaining compounds, 1-phenyl-2-thiourea has the lung as target organ and needs bio-activation, and triethylenemelamine affects the immune system.
Wang, Deng, Gong, Zhang, Zhang and colleagues (2015) showed that nASBPL increasing is related to the target organ damages in non-diabetic patients with CKD (left ventricular mass index, glomerular filtration rate, and proteinuria) and independent from ABP.
The present study evaluated the relationship of microalbuminuria with the indices of target organ damage in essential hypertensives; relationship between microalbuminuria and age of the patient; duration and severity of hypertension and other cardiovascular risk factors like smoking, dyslipidaemia and obesity.
The aim of the first step (interactive segmentation of the start slices) is to find the initial region of the target organ (liver) so that it can be used as prior (intensity and shape) knowledge of the organ as the following steps for automatic segmentation.
Our survey of literature confirmed that no studies of PG had been conducted to explore BPV and target organ damage in SHR.
The disproportion between the increased endogenous GLP-1 secretion and decreased GLP-1R expression in enteropancreatic axis target organs results in an impaired/diminished GLP-1R signaling in pancreas and stomach, respectively (Figure 5(a)).
Infiltration of autoreactive T cells into the target organ.
This study was done because hypertension is a common problem in our setup and the associated target organ damage like retinopathy is an important indicator which if detected and treated effectively can decrease both mortality and morbidity.
For those that have borderline readings, for example, 135/85mmHg, clinicians must assess their cardiovascular risk score and look for target organ damage.
Furthermore, future studies should be conducted to correlate the AVP with others non- vascular target organ damage and assess their contribution to the improvement in cardiovascular risk stratification.
Two theories account for the amyloid deposition; first, the local synthesis of amyloid within the target organ produces the proteins locally resulting in only single organ involvement.