NHS target culture

(redirected from target culture)

NHS target culture

A UK term of art referring to the focusing by managers in NHS organisations on objective and tangible goals (targets), including financial targets (e.g., cutting an annual budget by £5 million) or time targets (e.g., being seen within 4 hours by a doctor or nurse in A&E or beginning definitive cancer therapy within 31 days of urgent GP referral, etc.), often to the exclusion of non-objective measures of care quality, including changing of bed linen, responding to call alarms, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This has been the main focus for the new Cabinet Office Minister Matthew Hancock who has said that the Government is moving from a target culture to a data culture.
It domesticates because it serves the interest of the target culture, and it foreignizes because it creates and interpolates 'foreign' elements not present in the source text" (20).
Scottish Labour's justice spokesperson, Hugh Henry MSP said: "Chief Constable Stephen House has consistently claimed that there is no target culture in place at Police Scotland, but the testimony of serving officers contradicts this.
He told BBC2's Victoria Derbyshire yesterday: "There have been difficult decisions made on funding because we have inherited a target culture of saying we've to meet four-hour targets in A&E.
Toury also developed the concept of initial norm, which is related to the decision to follow the source text norms or the ones of the target culture.
Chief Constable Jeff Farrar, lead for crime recording at the Association of Chief Police Officers, said: "Pressures from workload and target culture, use of professional judgement in the interests of victims, lack of understanding of recording rules or inadequate supervision can all lead to inaccurate crime recording.
Many times the sole translation of the website content is not enough - you have to localize a site to suit the target culture and language.
TCC instructors provide sixteen hours of core culture and country-specific training and then travel with the cadets for a two to three week immersion in the target culture.
Senior management need to understand that the tickbox target culture can sometimes have unforeseen consequences outside their own narrow silo of responsibility.
In a similar manner, cultural values that underlie a communicative event can be taught through exposing ESL learners to cultural facts about the target culture, which is usually presented as a homogeneous construct.
When you have a target culture then everyone becomes concerned to reach the targets and I'm sure there are cases when things go wrong but to suggest this is a special issue is too strong.