NHS target culture

(redirected from target culture)

NHS target culture

A UK term of art referring to the focusing by managers in NHS organisations on objective and tangible goals (targets), including financial targets (e.g., cutting an annual budget by £5 million) or time targets (e.g., being seen within 4 hours by a doctor or nurse in A&E or beginning definitive cancer therapy within 31 days of urgent GP referral, etc.), often to the exclusion of non-objective measures of care quality, including changing of bed linen, responding to call alarms, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The students should develop a sensitivity to the manner in which cultural values are communicated, and further their observation skills of the target culture to better empower them to be culturally sensitive participants within the host culture.
The '80s target culture it examines has spread to schools and hospitals--that's how we all live now.
Cultural awareness implies an understanding of the need to consider cultural terrain in military operations, a knowledge of which cultural factors are important for a given situation and why, and a specified level of understanding for a target culture.
From a research perspective Cortazzi and Jin (1999) argued that L2 English materials reflect culture in one of these three ways: as cultural mirrors of the source culture, of the target culture, or of an international target culture in which English is not spoken as a first language.
Thus the body mapping groups clearly target culture, tradition and gender roles, providing a safe space in which oppressive aspects can be challenged, and participants can also reflect on how they are raising the next generation.
Universal approaches that will reach all youth should be considered, but we also need to tailor the approaches so the messages are culturally relevant, recognizable, and not offensive to the target culture.
These qualities are corroded by the target culture, just as they are corroded by the size of the controlling institution.
As a result, contemporary commercial culture geared for young adult audiences--like popular music, film, television, and literature--can run the risk of giving students the impression that the only apparent difference between the target culture and theirs is purely linguistic.
A THOROUGH KNOWLEDGE OF THE TARGET CULTURE, INCLUDING THE USE OF IDIOMATIC EXPRESSIONS, IS THE ONLY WAY FOR COMPANIES TO EFFECTIVELY GET THEIR MESSAGE ACROSS.
For example, the Chinese are a target culture in the United States but are obviously a dominant culture in China and several other places, including Singapore and Taiwan.
The belief that contact between cultures automatically leads to intercultural learning and to the development of positive attitudes towards the target culture has already been rejected by many (Allport, 1979; Coleman, 1998; Fischer, 1998) and Richter confirms that this is also the case for virtual intercultural contact: "The Internet brings about the contact of cultures, but this does not automatically imply cultural understanding" (1998, p.
Understand the culture--spend the time and money required to learn about the target culture.