tar


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tar

 [tahr]
a dark brown or black viscid liquid from the wood of various species of pine, or found as a by-product of the destructive distillation of bituminous coal (see coal tar). It is a complex mixture, the source of organic substances such as cresol, creosol, naphthalene, paraffin, phenol, and toluene. Formerly used as an oral medication in treatment of various conditions, it has been found to be toxic and carcinogenic and now has only limited topical use in certain skin diseases.
coal tar a by-product obtained in destructive distillation of bituminous coal; if its fumes are inhaled or if it is ingested in its natural state, it is toxic and carcinogenic. A preparation is used in ointment or solution in treatment of eczema and psoriasis.

TAR

Acronym for thrombocytopenia and absent radius. See: thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome.

tar

(tahr),
A thick, semisolid, blackish brown mass, of complex hydrocarbon composition, obtained by destructive distillation of carbonaceous materials. For individual tars, see specific names.

tar

(tahr) a dark-brown or black, viscid liquid obtained from various species of pine or from bituminous coal (coal t.). It is used for topical treatment of skin conditions, including eczema, psoriasis, and dandruff, but is toxic and carcinogenic by inhalation or ingestion.

tar

(tär)
n.
1. A dark, oily, viscous material, consisting mainly of hydrocarbons, produced by the destructive distillation of organic substances such as wood, coal, or peat.
2. See coal tar.
3. A solid residue of tobacco smoke containing byproducts of combustion.

tar

[tär]
Etymology: AS, teoru
a dark, viscid organic mixture produced by the distillation of coal, wood, or vegetable matter. Some forms of tar are used to treat eczema and other skin disorders.

TAR

Abbreviation for thrombocytopenia and absent radius.
See: thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome

tar

a dark-brown or black, viscid liquid obtained from various species of pine or from bituminous coal. See also wood tar derivatives.

coal tar
coal tar pitch
tar derivatives
include phenol (carbolic acid), cresols, creosote, all potent poisons. See also wood tar derivatives.
hot tar
a cause of burns in dogs and cats, usually made more severe because it sticks to the skin.
juniper tar
a volatile oil obtained from wood of Juniperus oxycedrus; used topically in the treatment of skin disease.
pine tar
a product of destructive distillation of the wood of various pine trees; used as a rubefacient and treatment for skin disease.
tar pitch
Stockholm tar
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile the worlds biggest banks are financing the consolidation and expanding production of one of the most extreme fossil fuels, tar sands, said Yann Louvel, Climate and Energy Campaign Coordinator at BankTrack.
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lawmakers deny permits for the transport of Canadian Boreal tar sands oil--most of which is extracted in land-locked regions--through the U.
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Whole Foods Market and Bed, Bath & Beyond pledged to stop buying transportation fuel linked to Canada's tar sands.