tantrum


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tantrum

 [tan´trum]
a violent display of temper.

tan·trum

(tan'trŭm),
A fit of bad temper, especially in children.

tantrum

[tan′trəm]
a sudden outburst or violent display of rage, frustration, and bad temper, usually occurring in a maladjusted child and certain emotionally disturbed people. The activity is usually not directed at anyone or anything specific but toward the environment in general and is used primarily as a device for attempting to control others and the surroundings. It most commonly occurs at age 2 to 2-½ years. Also called temper tantrum.
An inappropriate display of emotion or rage, generally understood to occur in public, often by a child or immature adult

tantrum

Vox populi An inappropriate display of anger. See Adult temper tantrum, Temper tantrum.

tan·trum

(tan'trŭm)
A fit of bad temper, especially in children.

tantrum

See TEMPER TANTRUM.

tan·trum

(tan'trŭm)
A fit of bad temper, especially in children.

tantrum,

n a sudden outburst or violent display of rage, frustration, and bad temper, usually occurring in a maladjusted child or immature or disturbed adult.
References in periodicals archive ?
com Baby tantrums can be really frustrating and stressful for the parents.
I like to think of tantrums as emotions that go beyond the child's control.
As EMs brace themselves for another possible round of capital flight as the Fed tightens monetary policy, potentially starting this year, they are likely to look back at what lessons they can learn from the 2013 taper tantrum.
The most common and obvious tantrums are seen at the time teenagers are frustrated and angry with their parent(s).
Mr Tantrum, 82, married to Bernice, of Howey, Powys, was a RWAS Silver Medallist and an Honorary Life Vice President of the society.
If you send a child away during a tantrum you're saying "I can't deal with your emotions.
In a surprising key finding, the study also debunks the common belief that temper tantrums are rampant among young children.
Provide time for the children to respond to this session in writing, for example, a letter to the giant in role, a letter to the giantologist, a list of tantrum avoidance tips.
Following his sister wherever she goes, he is no less in creating havoc and throwing tantrums when the occasion demands.
Rhesus macaque mothers are about twice as likely to let a howling infant have its way during very public tantrums than during more private moments, says Stuart Semple of Roehampton University in London.
Extreme tantrums often "run their lives," according to Dr.