tannin


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tannic acid

 [tan´ik]
a substance obtained from nutgalls, oak bark, and other plant parts, formerly used in medicine as an astringent. It is no longer used alone because it can be absorbed through mucous membranes or damaged skin in amounts sufficient to produce hepatic necrosis, although it is still used as a component of dermatological preparations.

tan·nin

(tan'in),
Any one of a group of complex nonuniform plant constituents that can be classified into hydrolyzable tannins (esters of a sugar, usually glucose, and one or several trihydroxybenzenecarboxylic acids) and condensed tannins (derivatives of flavonols). Tannins are used in tanning, dyeing, photography, and as clarifying agents for beer and wine. Sometimes used synonymously with tannic acid. Tannins form black stains in the presence of iron.

tannin

Herbal medicine
Any of a family of compounds that react with proteins to produce a leathery coating on animal tissues and give woods their brown, red and yellow hues; tannins are anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and astringent.

tan·nin

(tan'in)
A complex nonuniform plant constituent; used in tanning, dyeing, photography, and as clarifying agents for beer and wine.

tannin

a complex organic compound occurring widely in plant sap, particularly in bark, leaves and unripe fruits, that is used in the production of leather and ink.

tan·nin

(tan'in)
Complex nonuniform plant constituent used in tanning, dyeing, photography, and as clarifying agents for beer and wine. Sometimes used synonymously with tannic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because they are naturally made by plants, research suggests that tannins likely work our bodies the way other polyphenols do: by producing antioxidant and antimicrobial benefits, which can then help prevent disease.
The factors that propel the growth of the tannin industry include demand from food and beverages industry, advent of new technologies and R&D activities in automotive industry, and growing demand for wood adhesives.
The ATE, obtained from UCL Tannin Company Pty (Ltd), Dalton, South Africa, was extracted from the bark of black wattle (Acacia mearnsii) tree by steam distillation, and then concentrated into powdered form.
Scientists know that wine drinkers perceive astringency when tannins and salivary proteins interact, aggregate and precipitate, which makes the mouth less lubricated.
Based on previous research that examined the interaction of anthocyanins and tannins, it has been suggested that the A:T ratio plays an important role in polymeric pigment formation because both tannin and anthocyanin are needed for development of polymeric pigments.
Grippy tannins make this a perfect match for a grass-fed filet.
When the temperature reached 90[degrees]C, the reaction was maintained for 2 to 3 minutes before the tannin extract was added.
The smooth-yet-gripping tannins make an impressionable and impressive finish.
The astringency in persimmons is derived from the tannins accumulated in specialized cells of the mesocarp during the development of the fruits (Tessmer et al., 2014).
Growth and apparent absorption of minerals in broiler chickens fed diets with low and high tannin contents.
It is a medium-bodied wine with graceful texture, balanced acidity and very ripe, elegant tannins. The finish is moderately long, full of red fruits with a touch of sweet vanilla and black pepper.
Tannins were purified from Phyllanthus columnaris stem bark methanol extract, which was obtained from previous study.