tannic acid


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Related to tannic acid: tannin

tannic acid

 [tan´ik]
a substance obtained from nutgalls, oak bark, and other plant parts, formerly used in medicine as an astringent. It is no longer used alone because it can be absorbed through mucous membranes or damaged skin in amounts sufficient to produce hepatic necrosis, although it is still used as a component of dermatological preparations.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tan·nic ac·id

(tan'ik as'id),
A tannin that occurs in many plants, particularly in the bark of oaks and other members of the Fagaceae; used as a styptic and astringent, and in the treatment of diarrhea; available also as tannic acid glycerite. Sometimes used synonymously with tannin.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tan·nic ac·id

(tan'ik as'id)
A tannin that occurs in many plants; used as a styptic and astringent and to treat diarrhea.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

tannic acid

An antifungal drug, used externally to treat fungus infections of the skin. A brand name of a preparation containing tannic acid and other drugs is Phytex.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In recent year, more emphasis has been paid on solvent free synthesis, so we performed model reaction under solvent free condition we observed that the reaction was completed within 45 min and gave excellent yields of the products when using tannic acid under solvent free condition (Table1, entry 9).
Tannic acid has been used as inducer for tannase production; however, a great increase in its concentration do not promote an equivalent increase in enzyme synthesis (BATTESTIN; MACEDO, 2007).
The effect of 100 300 and 500 g/ml concentrations of Tannic Acid on acid production by C.
But the investigators still have to determine the exact amount of tannic acid needed to prevent allergic reactions, without altering the flavor of a product or reducing its protein levels.
The tannic acid levels were 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 milligrams (mg) per milliliter of peanut butter extract.
Tonogai, "Effects of the oral administration of green tea polyphenol and tannic acid on serum and hepatic lipid contents and fecal steroid excretion in rats," Journal of Health Science, vol.
Figure 3 shows also that tannic acid ceases to act as a reducing agent beyond the limit of 30 mL of TA (tannic to chloroauric acid ratio of 5.9: 1).
However, very recently, tannic acid being a polyphenolic plant extract has been given attention since it is an aggressive reducing agent and behaves as stabilizer as well.
Xing, "Tannic acid adsorption and its role for stabilizing carbon nanotube suspensions," Environmental Science and Technology, vol.
For ascorbic and tannic acid the [Ec.sub.50] values obtained were 1.73 [+ or -] 0.02 and 1.06 [+ or -] 0.01ppm, respectively, while for EELB the [Ec.sub.50] found was 7.71 [+ or -] 0.63ppm.
Gently removing burned clothing from singed skin, the doctors and nurses treated their patients with ointments and tannic acid, a principal medicine then used in burn care.