tampon

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tampon

 [tam´pon]
a pack, pad, or plug made of cotton, sponge, or other material; different types are used to plug the nose, vagina, or other areas for the control of hemorrhage or the absorption of secretions. Superabsorbent tampons worn monthly and inserted roughly can cause ulceration of the vaginal mucosa. Both vaginal and nasal tampons have been implicated in the development of toxic shock syndrome.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tam·pon

(tam'pon),
1. A cylinder or ball of cotton-wool, gauze, or other loose substance; used as a plug or pack in a canal or cavity to restrain hemorrhage, absorb secretions, or maintain a displaced organ in position.
2. To insert such a plug or pack.
[O. Fr.]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tampon

(tăm′pŏn′)
n.
A plug of absorbent material inserted into a body cavity or wound to stop a flow of blood or to absorb secretions, especially one designed for insertion into the vagina during menstruation.
tr.v. tam·poned, tam·poning, tam·pons
To plug or stop with a tampon.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tampon

Gynecology A device inserted per vagina to absorb menses. See Toxic shock syndrome.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tam·pon

(tam'pon)
1. A cylinder or ball of cotton wool, gauze, or other loose substance; used as a plug or pack in a canal or cavity to restrain hemorrhage, absorb secretions, or maintain a displaced organ in position.
2. To insert such a plug or pack.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

tampon

A cylindrical mop of absorbent material placed in the VAGINA to absorb menstrual blood and allow freedom of activity during the menstrual period.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

tam·pon

(tam'pon)
A cylinder or ball of cotton-wool, gauze, or other loose substance; used as a plug or pack in a canal or cavity to restrain hemorrhage, absorb secretions, or maintain a displaced organ in position.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
From interviews conducted by the Star, it was established that most non-users believed tampons are a luxury that can be done away with.
Campaigners have been fighting for the abolishment of the tampon tax for years to make sanitary products more affordable to millions, especially the one in 10 that can't afford it as a basic living item.
The woman uploaded a photo of the tampon with the hook sticking out on Facebook.
"To further ill-advise them on the imaginary connotations of using tampons is shameful and must be condemned."
Pain was evaluated by a nurse using a visual analog scale (VAS) numbered from 0 to 10 (0 representing the least pain and 10 the maximum pain) at two times: 12 hours after surgery and during the removal of the tampons. Patient painkiller intake was divided into three categories: category A, per os: dipyrone 1 g (metamizole in the United States), acetaminophen 1 g, or oxycodone 5 mg and naloxone 2.5mg); category B, per os: oxycodone 5mg and acetaminophen 325 mg or tramadol 50 mg; and category C, intravenous: tramadol 100 mg.
"One cup costs about 37,000 won ($35) and you have to pay about 13,000 won for delivery, which is still far cheaper than having to buy tampons or pads every month."
Here's what Aliya, 10, Minnesota, recommends: "Get a make-up bag or pencil bag, put in a few pads and tampons and, if you want, an extra pair of undies.
EU officials said Cameron persuaded his peers to give special mention to tampons because all of them are anxious that he win the referendum to keep Britain in the bloc.
So why are tampon companies hell-bent on making applicators out of ocean-polluting plastic?
According to Legare, his wife has complained about tampons falling short during water activities for years.
When tampons or pads are donated, we give them out and the response has been heartfelt gratitude."
Yesterday Bill Cash, the Tory MP for Stone, insisted on saying "products" instead of "tampons", during a debate over attempts to axe the five per cent VAT "tampon tax".