gigantism

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gigantism

 [ji-gan´tizm, ji´gan-tizm]
abnormal overgrowth of the body or a part; excessive size and stature. Generally applied to a rare abnormality of the pituitary gland, which secretes excessive growth hormone before the growing ends of the bones have closed. This causes a child to become an unusually tall adult; if the abnormality is extreme, the individual may reach a height of 2.4 meters (8 feet) or more, although the body proportions usually are normal.

The opposite condition, dwarfism, is caused by underproduction of the same hormone. (Overproduction of growth hormone in adults causes acromegaly.) Gigantism can be corrected only by early diagnosis in childhood and removal by surgery of part of the pituitary gland or by x-ray treatment.
cerebral gigantism gigantism in the absence of increased levels of growth hormone, attributed to a cerebral defect; infants are large, and accelerated growth continues for the first 4 or 5 years, the rate being normal thereafter. The hands and feet are large, the head is large, narrow and long, and the eyes have an antimongoloid slant with an abnormally wide space between them. The child is clumsy, and mental retardation of varying degree is usually present. Called also Sotos syndrome.
pituitary gigantism that caused by oversecretion of growth hormone by the pituitary gland; see gigantism. Called also Launois syndrome.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

gi·gan·tism

(jī'gan-tizm, jī-gan'tizm),
A condition of abnormal size or overgrowth of the entire body or of any of its parts.
Synonym(s): giantism
[G. gigas, giant]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gigantism

(jī-găn′tĭz′əm)
n.
1. The quality or state of being gigantic; abnormally large size.
2. Excessive growth of the body or any of its parts, especially as a result of oversecretion of the growth hormone by the pituitary gland. Also called giantism.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

gi·gan·tism

(jī-gant'izm)
A condition of abnormal size or overgrowth of the entire body or of any of its parts.
Synonym(s): giantism.
[G. gigas, giant]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

gigantism

Excessive body growth. This is usually the result of an abnormal production of growth hormone by the pituitary gland in childhood, before the growing ends of the bones (the epiphyses) have fused. The excess hormone production is almost always due to a benign tumour-a pituitary adenoma. The height may exceed 2.4 m. Excess growth hormone after fusion of the epiphyses causes ACROMEGALY.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

gigantism

a rare human condition in which excess production of GROWTH HORMONE by the anterior PITUITARY GLAND during childhood and adolescence causes over-elongation of bones, producing a pituitary giant. See also ACROMEGALY. Compare DWARFISM.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Gigantism

Excessive growth, especially in height, resulting from overproduction during childhood or adolescence of growth hormone by a pituitary tumor. Untreated, the tumor eventually destroys the pituitary gland, resulting in death during early adulthood. If the tumor develops after growth has stopped, the result is acromegaly, not gigantism.
Mentioned in: Growth Hormone Tests
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

gi·gan·tism

(jī-gant'izm)
A condition of abnormal size or overgrowth of the entire body or of any of its parts. Also called giantism.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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