talipes


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talipes

 [tal´ĭ-pēz]
a deformity in which the foot is twisted out of normal position; see also clubfoot and see illustration. It may have an abnormally high longitudinal arch (talipes cavus) or it may be in dorsiflexion (talipes calcaneus), in plantar flexion (talipes equinus), abducted and everted (talipes valgus or flatfoot), adducted and inverted (talipes varus), or various combinations of these (talipes calcaneovalgus, talipes calcaneovarus, talipes equinovalgus, or talipes equinovarus).



There are several theories as to the cause of clubfoot. A familial tendency or arrested growth during fetal life may contribute to its development, or it may be caused by a defect in the ovum. It sometimes accompanies meningomyelocele as a result of paralysis. In mild clubfoot there are slight changes in the structure of the foot; more severe cases involve orthopedic deformities of both the foot and leg. Although clubfoot is usually congenital, an occasional case in an older child may be caused by injury or poliomyelitis.

Treatment varies according to the severity of the deformity. Milder cases may be corrected with casts that are changed periodically, the foot being manipulated into position each time the cast is changed so that it gradually assumes normal position. A specially designed splint may also be used, made of two plates attached to shoes with a crossbar between the plates and special set screws so that the angulation of the foot can be changed as necessary. More severe deformities require surgery of the tendons and bones, followed by the application of a cast to maintain proper position of the joint.
Talipes.

tal·i·pes

(tal'i-pēz),
Any deformity of the foot involving the talus.
[L. talus, ankle, + pes, foot]

talipes

(tăl′ə-pēz′)
n.

talipes

Latin, talipes = talus–ankle + pes–foot A general term for clubfoot–a congenital foot deformity involving the talus. See Clubfoot.

tal·i·pes

(tal'i-pēz)
Any deformity of the foot involving the talus.
[L. talus, ankle, + pes, foot]

talipes

Clubfoot. A congenital deformity affecting the shape or position of one or both feet. In talipes cavus, there is exaggeration of the curvature of the longitudinal arch. In talipes equinovarus the ankle is extended and the heel and sole turned inwards.
References in periodicals archive ?
The neonate was noted to have arthrogryposis involving the hips, wrists, and ankles, as well as bilateral talipes equinovarus.
Several diseases are reportedly associated with RAPK, including plantar keratoderma, talipes equinovarus, acrokeratoelastoidosis, psoriasis, nevus spilus, nevus anemicus, acne excorie [45], nonscarring alopecia [56], and bony anomalies in the form of the absence or hypoplasia of the terminal phalanx of the toes [52].
Anomalies included cardiovascular malformations, neural tube defect, microcephaly, limb reduction defect, and congenital talipes equinovarus.
At birth, the patient had coarse facial features with midface retraction, frontal bossing, bitemporal narrowing, wide anterior fontanel, hypertrichosis over the forehead, low nasal bridge, ocular hypertelorism, low set ears, abdominal distention, and bilateral talipes equinovarus (Figure 1).
Bunlarin disinda omuz kusagi displazisi, talipes ekinovarus ya da ekinovalgus, kalkaneovalgus, pes planus, lomber lordozda belirginlesme, skolyoz, pektus ekskavatum, proksimal ekstremite kaslarinda yetersiz gelisim, eklem kontrakturleri gibi kas-iskelet anomalileri de tanimlanmistir [1-4].
[12] These outlined priority CDs that are common in SA and added talipes equinovarus, congenital infections and genetic deafness, blindness, physical handicap and mental retardation to the initial list of conditions for inclusion.
Material and Methods: The Ponseti method for the management of congenital talipes equinovarus was applied in children of 7 days to 6 months age.
Club foot, also called talipes, is a condition where a baby is born with one or both of their feet twisted out of shape.
Talipes equinovarus and facial defects are also among the main congenital malformations encountered in the offspring of obese women.
These malformations were classified into nine broad categories, and among those polydactyly had the highest representation (n=109; 71%; proportion: 0.7124 ; 95%-CI : 0.6407-0.7841), followed by syndactyly (n=14; 9%; prop.: 0.0915; 95% CI: 0.0458-0.1372), absence deformities (n=9), musculoskeletal defects (n=6), talipes (n=5), contracture anomalies (n=4), brachydactyly (n=2), leg defects (disproportionate leg length; n=2), and overriding toe (n=2) (Table-I; Fig.1).