talcosis


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talcosis

 [tal-ko´sis]
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tal·co·sis

(tal-kō'sis),
A pulmonary disorder related to silicosis, occurring in workers exposed to talc mixed with silicates; characterized by restrictive or obstructive disorders of breathing or the two in combination.
[talc + G. -osis, condition]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

talcosis

Public health Intravascular, perivascular, and alveolar granulomas in which talc and sometimes starch can be identified, a finding typical of IV drug abusers, which may cause defects in pulmonary function
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tal·co·sis

(tal-kō'sis)
A pulmonary disorder related to silicosis occurring in workers exposed to talc mixed with silicates; characterized by restrictive or obstructive disorders of breathing or the two in combination.
[talc + G. -osis, condition]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

talcosis

A lung disease caused by inhalation of talc dust and characterized by chronic induration and fibrosis.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pulmonary talcosis, talcosilicosis, and talcoasbestosis may result from occupational exposures to talc dust containing pure or variable amounts of silica or asbestos, respectively.
In a review of several case reports of symptomatic pulmonary talcosis, patients typically presented with initial dyspnea to progressive exertional dyspnea, fatigue, and cough with or without systemic symptoms such as fever, chills, or night sweats [6, 7].
When diagnosing pulmonary talcosis, physical exam and laboratory exams are usually unremarkable.
The natural history of pulmonary talcosis is said to be slowly progressive, even after exposure of dust has ceased [3].
Nobre, "Pulmonary talcosis: imaging findings," Lung, vol.
Muller, "Talcosis associated with IV abuse of oral medications: CT findings," American Journal of Roentgenology, vol.
Pulmonary 'mainline' granulomatosis: talcosis of intravenous methadone abuse.
Particle size for differentiation between inhalation and injection pulmonary talcosis. Environ Res.
Third, talcosis, caused by inhalation of pure talc, may include acute or chronic bronchitis as well as interstitial inflammation; radiographically it appears as reticular or nodular abnormalities, and functionally it causes small airway obstruction.
Nontuberculous mycobacterial infection has also been reported in talcosis (De Coster et al.
Inhalational pulmonary talcosis: high-resolution CT findings in 3 patients.