wing

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wing

(wing),
1. One of the vertebrate forelimbs adapted for flying, as in bats and birds.
2. Any appendage adapted for flying, as in insects.
3. Any flattened, laterally projecting process.
Synonym(s): ala (1)
[Fr. Middle English winge, wenge, from Old Norse vaenger, wing]

wing

(wĭng)
n.
1. Any of various paired movable organs of flight, as that of a bird or insect.
2. Something that resembles a wing in appearance, function, or position relative to a main body.

wing

(wing) [TA]
1. The anterior appendage of a bird.
2. anatomy Ala (q.v.).
[Fr. Middle English winge, wenge, from Old Norse vaenger, wing]

wing

  1. either of the modified fore limbs of a bird that are covered with large feathers and specialized for flight in most species.
  2. one of the organs of flight of an insect, consisting of a membranous outgrowth from the thorax containing a network of veins.
  3. either of the organs of flight in certain other animals, especially the forelimb of a bat.

wing

(wing) [TA]
Any flattened, laterally projecting process.
Synonym(s): ala.
[Fr. Middle English winge, wenge, from Old Norse vaenger, wing]

wing

a modified limb suitable for generating aerodynamic lift. Wing membranes or patagia are stretched between bony elements. In birds the wing surface is increased by large flight feathers (remiges) borne on the hand (primaries) or ulna (secondaries). In bats the patagia are more extensive than in birds through enlargement of the bones of the hand.

wing amputation
the extreme form of deflighting.
dropped wing
a name for Salmonella typhimurium infection in young pigeons which causes arthritis in the wing.
wing louse
lipeuruscaponis.
wing vein
cutaneous ulnar vein; on the under surface of the extended wing, the favored location for venepuncture in most avian species.
References in periodicals archive ?
Suddenly, the Birmingham City flair men are taking wing - in some cases, literally - and the consequences have been encouraging.
The second half of the concert was mostly about taking wing, literally, with ``The Flight to Neverland'' from ``Hook,'' two pieces from ``Superman,'' and the flying theme from ``E.
But despite the poetic intent, it seemed mired in words rather than taking wing in dance.
CHICAGO -- A second generation of fixed wireless providers is taking wing in the marketplace, launching an industry renaissance that could dim the memory of earlier fixed wireless high-flyers that crashed and burned.
Flanker Williams eased their nerves, taking wing Hal Luscombe's pass and touching down against the post under pressure from three Italian defenders.