shape

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shape

(shāp) [AS. sceapan]
1. To mold to a particular form.
2. Outward form; contour.
References in periodicals archive ?
It will provide a draw to potential students who want to achieve sporting excellence while at university and it is exciting to see the project taking shape so quickly.
The personality is the latest famous face to give their support to the charity project currently taking shape in the ground floor of the Bling Building on Hanover Street.
Mark Hill, Jomast commercial property manager, said: "The development is rapidly taking shape and with the first structures in place, we are looking to commence the next phase of construction over the forthcoming weeks.
The new 30,000-seater stadium, which will be the home of both Cardiff City Football Club and Cardiff Blues, is now firmly on its way with the steel frame structure of the stadium now taking shape.
Tremblant's Versant Soleil development is taking shape.
Newark is undergoing a tremendous renaissance with exciting new office, retail and residential developments taking shape throughout the city, and we are proud to be a part of this exciting revitalization.
Titled ``A Magical Place to Call Home,'' the float is taking shape, with the metal framework now complete.
THE largest community arts centre in Europe which is being built in the middle of West Bromwich is finally taking shape, 15 years after the idea was first mooted.
A company in Stratford-uponAvon has joined the handful of jewellery specialists in the UK able to offer a design package allowing the customer to see their piece taking shape on screen.
In Cardiff, the Wales' Millennium Centre, designed by the Percy Thomas Partnership, is presently taking shape on a large irregular site to the north of Richard Rogers' National Assembly, also under construction.
It is, after all, a time when English was still being consolidated as a single language; when the struggle between Protestantism and Catholicism for the national soul was also taking shape as a struggle between Latin and the vernacular; and when the literary and linguistic consequences of the printing revolution had not yet been fully felt or understood.