guard

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guard

 [gahrd]
a protective device.
mouth guard any of various removable intraoral appliances that protect the teeth and sometimes the lips and cheeks during contact sports.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

guard

(gahrd)
1. To watch over so as to protect or maintain control.
2. A person or thing performing such a function.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

guard

A device for protecting something (e.g., a mouth guard or a face guard).

occlusal guard

A removable dental appliance that covers one or both arches and is designed to minimize the damaging effects of bruxism, jaw and head trauma during contact sports, or any detrimental occlusal habits.
See: nightguard; mouth guard
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Durham needed 48 off the last five overs and 16 from the final six deliveries with bowlers Nicky Phillips and Neil Killeen taking guard. But their hopes had disappeared with Lewis' dismissal and they finished seven runs short on 196 for eight.
Taking guard for the first delivery after lunch, Atherton pulled Kashif Raza's short ball but mistimed his shot and gloved to slip, leaving him only one more innings to find his form before the Test.
TAKING GUARD Skipper Pietersen is shadowed by armed guards as the England team arrives in Chennai yesterday; EVER FREDDIE Flintoff is 'comfortable' to return
The ICC policy states that microphones can be switched on while the ball is live but must be turned off between deliveries unless a batsman is taking guard at the start of his innings.
"Then to get down to the striker's end was brilliant, taking guard, looking at him coming in - and then I wasn't sure which way it was going.
The groggy England vice-captain had been checked out on the pitch by team doctor Nick Pierce and physio Kirk Russell before taking guard again.