take

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take

(tāk),
A successful grafting operation or vaccination.

take

a popular term for a satisfactory response, as of a vaccination or tissue graft.

take

Admission of patients to hospital either through A&E or by GP referral. The medical and surgical teams rotate on take during the day and at night. The firm in hospital on take administer patients and assume responsibility for their care.

take

Immunology noun A popular term for a vaccine's efficacy; it is said to 'have taken' if there is a ≥ 4-fold ↑ in antibody titers Transplant immunology The adherence of a free skin graft occurring between days 3 and 5 of the transfer of skin Vox populi Opinion, as in, '…what's your 'take' on this…'
References in classic literature ?
Thus King Louis lost Lombardy by not having followed any of the conditions observed by those who have taken possession of countries and wished to retain them.
Jove,' he said, 'has laid his hand over the city to protect it, and the people have taken heart.
Well now, she shouldn't have taken the brooch, Marilla, or told stories about it," he admitted, mournfuly surveying his plateful of unromantic pork and greens as if he, like Anne, thought it a food unsuited to crises of feeling, "but she's such a little thing--such an interesting little thing.
When her dishes were washed and her bread sponge set and her hens fed Marilla remembered that she had noticed a small rent in her best black lace shawl when she had taken it off on Monday afternoon on returning from the Ladies' Aid.
But what he liked particularly was the way in which at once, as though on purpose that there might be no misunderstanding with an outsider, she called Vronsky simply Alexey, and said they were moving into a house they had just taken, what was here called a palazzo.
It's in the guide-book," said Golenishtchev, referring to the palazzo Vronsky had taken.
In the first place, she was taken excellent care of--being treated (as I took care to mention in the town) on the footing of a lady.
I have taken pains enough to satisfy it at any rate.
He rose immediately, for he swam like a cork, and called to me, begged to be taken in, told me he would go all over the world with me.
I could have been content to have taken this Moor with me, and have drowned the boy, but there was no venturing to trust him.
Ay,' says my comrade, 'then it was those rogues that thrust me down, I warrant ye; I wonder the gentlewoman did not miss her watch before, then we might have taken them.
Hugh, deeming it possible that Barnaby was in the hands of the soldiers, and at that moment under detention at The Boot, was for advancing stealthily, and firing the house; but his companions, who objected to such rash measures unless they had a crowd at their backs, represented that if Barnaby were taken he had assuredly been removed to a stronger prison; they would never have dreamed of keeping him all night in a place so weak and open to attack.