tail

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tail

 [tāl]
any slender appendage; called also cauda.
tail of spermatozoon the flagellum of a spermatozoon; it has four regions: the neck, middle piece, principal piece, and end piece.

tail

(tāl), [TA]
1. Any tail, or taillike structure, or tapering or elongated extremity of an organ or other part. Synonym(s): cauda [TA]
2. veterinary anatomy a free appendage representing the caudal end of the vertebral column; covered by skin and hair, feathers, or scales.
[A.S. taegl]

tail

(tāl)
n.
The posterior part of an animal, especially when elongated and extending beyond the trunk or main part of the body.
adj.
Of or relating to a tail or tails: tail feathers.
v. tailed, tailing, tails
v.tr.
To deprive of a tail; dock.

tail′less adj.

tail

adjective Referring to an elongated terminal tapering of an organism, cell, molecule, statistic or other component in a system that slowly arrives to a baseline or disappears.
 
Herbal medicine
noun A trivial name for certain plants—e.g., cat tail, mare’s tail.

Malpractice
noun The end of a period of malpractice liability exposure.

Molecular biology
noun A sequence of nucleotides at the end of a molecule of nucleic acid.

Surgery
noun An elongated mass of tissue.

tail

adjective Referring to an elongated terminal tapering of an organism, cell, molecule, statistic, or other component in a system that slowly arrives to a baseline or disappears noun Surgery An elongated mass of tissue. See Axillary tail.

tail

(tāl) [TA]
1. Any taillike structure, or tapering or elongated extremity of an organ or other part.
2. veterinary anatomy A free appendage representing the caudal end of the vertebral column, covered by skin and hair, feathers, or scales.
Synonym(s): cauda [TA] .
[A.S. taegl]

tail

  1. the rear-most part of an animal.
  2. (in vertebrates) that part behind the anus.

tail

(tāl) [TA]
Any taillike structure or tapering or elongated extremity.
Synonym(s): cauda [TA] .
[A.S. taegl]

Patient discussion about tail

Q. If I sit too long I get a pain in my tail bone area, when I stand it goes away...any idea? I also get a pain just like it on the bottom of my left foot that goes away.

A. Coccygodynia (pain of the tail bone) is not rare and can radiate from the lower back area. Usually it goes away on its own, however if the pain bothers you a lot you can apply anti-inflammation creams locally. If this pain is very disturbing for a while you should see a doctor to examine you once and check there is nothing else there that can cause the pain. Physical activity usually solves low back pain and might help in your case too.

More discussions about tail
References in periodicals archive ?
"I think it would be nice to incorporate this further-developed prosthetic tail into daily life, when one seeks a little more help balancing," said Nabeshima.
Tail docking is a common procedure carried out in sheep farms in countries as United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and Brazil (KENT et al., 2000; MORRIS, 2000; SEBRAE, 2009; COCKRAM et al., 2012).
"No living spider has a tail, although some relatives of spiders, the vinegaroons, do have an anal flagellum," the (https://today.ku.edu/2018/02/01/remarkable-spider-tail-found-conserved-amber-after-100-million-years) University of Kansas said in a statement.
Geckos are able to re-grow a new tail within 30 days, faster than any other type of lizard.
With C, CO 12 sts, leaving a long tail for finishing.
To analyze the contribution of that tail push, Goldman and colleagues sent a two-limbed robot with a movable tail up slopes of dry plastic particles or poppy seeds.
But the tail of Ursa Major is a fascinating sight in itself.
What's more, while both square and round tails could bend with the same radius of curvature, the square tail provided more points of contact.
But to walk, they put all four feet and their thick, heavy tails on the ground.
Eastern gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) are known to communicate visually with their tails (Steele and Koprowski, 2001).