targeted therapy

(redirected from tailored therapy)

targeted therapy

A generic term for therapies that impact on a specific molecular pathway, target or ligand.

Examples
Gefitimib for non-small cell carcinoma of the lungs with mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor, and imatinib for GIST tumours with activating mutations in c-Kit.
References in periodicals archive ?
Identifying the impact of sleep apnoea on women as an area of high unmet medical need, ResMed has designed a completely integrated sleep solution delivering tailored therapy choices specifically for women.
Tikvah Layeled is a specialist treatment center that provides individually tailored therapy for cerebral palsy children.
Cardiff's Capitol Shopping Centre, on Queen Street, has partnered up with Bobath, which provides tailored therapy for children who have cerebral palsy and other neurological conditions.
Tailored therapy and close supervision may help 1 keep competitive athletes with long QT syndrome in the game, a study has shown.
5) For those persons with advanced HF or ADHF, tailored therapy often includes the addition of positive inotropic agents such as dobutamine.
Even ultrasound, that most anatomical of techniques, is now utilising molecularly targeted micro-bubbles to take diagnosis to the cellular level, and similar bubbles can be used to deliver tailored therapy agents to tumour tissue by using the ultrasound beam to disrupt them in situ.
MSCC is one of the few global leaders in Cancer Care capable of providing individualized characterization and tailored therapy options.
By working closely with physiotherapists and other health professionals, the Unicorn Centre offers its riders tailored therapy and tuition based on their capabilities and ambitions.
Evidence suggests that we will see a shift from the traditional paradigm of chronic disease diagnosis and management to one of disease prevention, early treatment, tailored therapy, and genome/proteome/cellulome-guided disease management.
Armed with new data and tools that enable visualization of common genetic patterns exhibited between diseases and elucidation of the biological pathways affected by genetic alterations, research scientists are not only uncovering new drug targets, but are also making interesting observations for novel approaches to drug screening and tailored therapy.
These discoveries might lead the way to allowing clinicians to test whether a specific gene is the problem in infertile women, allowing for improved diagnostic tests and tailored therapy in the future.
Hosford hopes that such research lead to a more tailored therapy designed to attack the mechanism of petit mal and perhaps treat the seizures without producing some of the more unfortunate side effects" caused by current drugs.