taijin kyofusho


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A social phobia described in Japan characterised as an intense fear that one’s body, body parts, or functions are offensive to others

taijin kyofusho

(tī-jēn-kyō-foo-shō) [Jap., literally, “fear of interpersonal relationships disorder”],

TKS

A culture-bound syndrome in Japan in which a person becomes fearful that he or she is offensive to others. In the West it is considered a form of social anxiety disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cultural factors in social anxiety: A comparison of social phobia symptoms and Taijin Kyofusho.
Interestingly, most Asian cultures are more "collectivist"--concerned with group harmony--than are Western cultures, so taijin kyofusho may reflect the manifestation of extreme social anxiety in societies in which upsetting others is a cardinal sin.
The condition is briefly mentioned in the text on delusion disorder, somatic subtype and social phobia (given that some patients with taijin kyofusho (a condition related to social phobia) may suffer from concerns that their body odour is offensive).
Rather, taijin kyofusho is characterized by "an individual's intense fear that his or her body, its parts or its functions, displease, embarrass, or are offensive to other people in appearance, odor, facial expressions, or movements" (DSM-IV-TR, 2000, p.
La popularizacion y globalizacion del consumo de antidepresivos es buena prueba de ello, pues en este proceso la biomedicina y la industria farmaceutica confluyen para crear una estructura significante con capacidad de resignificar los diferentes males locales (el Taijin kyofusho en Japon, la saudade en Brasil, la fatigue en Francia, etc.
An example of a culture-bound syndrome is taijin kyofusho, a Japanese syndrome that refers to an individual's intense fear that his or her body or its functions are offensive to other people.