tactile defensiveness

tac·tile de·fen·sive·ness

(tak'til dĕ-fen'siv-nĕs)
Excessive reaction to tactile stimulation.

tactile defensiveness

Behaviors such as avoidance or withdrawal in response to being touched by another person. These defensive reactions are seen most often in children with autism or related disorders.
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References in periodicals archive ?
These Sensory Mini Mats are sensory integration tools designed for sensory seekers of all ages to provide a non-threatening interaction for tactile defensiveness and to engage children to touch and describe textures.
Furthermore, there is evidence that there is a heritable aspect to sensory processing abnormalities, and tactile defensiveness is associated with fearful temperament and anxiety (J Abnorm Child Psychol.
The current clinical identification of SID can be categorized into four patterns: "Visual perception and Auditory-Language Disorders," "Tactile Defensiveness," "Disorders involving the Vestibular System," and "Developmental Dyspraxia." While children with SID (CwSID) may not have all the symptoms of a certain dysfunction, they usually have several symptoms of these four patterns (Ayres & Robbins, 2005; Kranowitz & Miller, 2006; Miller & Fuller, 2007).
Second, the Wii remote, nunchuk and balance board are devices that need to beheld or touched by the players, and this form of interaction may not be welcomed by CwSID who have tactile defensiveness problems.
provides an unusual interactive book format directed to parents, kids and professionals alike and uses the 'drawing journal' format to discuss 'tactile defensiveness', or hypersensitivity to certain kinds of touch (and, by definition, certain kinds of clothing).
"They have tactile defensiveness. They don't look in people's eyes, they won't hug their parents, and they are hypersensitive to touch and sound.
Grandin found touch to be helpful in establishing her sense of physical location, but noted that touch could also be troublesome due to her tactile defensiveness.
In extreme conditions such as Tactile Defensiveness (TD), children can have painful reactions to the everyday textures that most of us disregard.
Have you ever witnessed the anxiety of a person with autism and tactile defensiveness during a doctor's exam or a medical procedure?
He demonstrates a clear hypersensitivity to touch, generally called tactile defensiveness. This causes behavioral consequences that are demonstrated two ways: protection from tactile overload by squirming, pulling away, running away, and crying; or shutting down completely by refusing to participate or pushing food away.