tackle


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tackle

Sports medicine
1. A maneuver in football and rugby in which a player on team A brings down another player, ideally on the opposite team, who is carrying the ball.
2. The equipment used in certain sports–eg, fishing.
References in periodicals archive ?
"As a result, the acceptable height of the tackle will be lowered through revised on-field and off-field sanctions, encouraging players to bend at the waist when attempting a tackle."
He knew what he needed to tackle; one of his leaders was micro-doing.
According to the new amendment, if an official determines a dangerous high tackle or shoulder charge warrants a red card, then they must first verify it with the TMO.
Boly's tackle bore resemblance to Vincent Kompany's on Mohamed Salah in City's recent 2-1 win at the Etihad, but the Belgium centre-back avoided a straight red.
The new law amendment for the 2018/19 Championship Cup Law 9.13 will now read: 'A player must not tackle an opponent early, late or dangerously.
Difference in momentum between the ball-carrier and tackler is postulated to contribute to the risk of injury and play a part in predicting the outcome the tackle (Brooks et al., 2005; Eaton and George, 2006; Fuller et al., 2010; Garraway et al., 1999; Headey et al., 2007; Hendricks and Lambert, 2010; McIntosh et al., 2010; Quarrie and Hopkins, 2008; Sundaram et al., 2011; Takarada, 2003).
Sutton was the second of consecutive defensive tackles taken by the Bears in the second and third rounds of the NFL draft.
It really depends, one tackle could mess up or dislocate your shoulder, or you could make 23 tackles and some of them might be soak tackles rather than impact tackles.
At one time you were taught and encouraged as a young player not to show your opponent you were hurt or in pain after a tackle because then you would have a psychological advantage in your personal battle with him.
People say it was dangerous but EVERY tackle is dangerous.