tachypnea


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tachypnea

 [tak″ip-ne´ah]
very rapid respirations, seen especially in high fever when the body attempts to rid itself of excess heat. The rate of respiration increases at a ratio of about eight breaths per minute for every degree Celsius above normal. Other causes include pneumonia, compensatory respiratory alkalosis as the body tries to “blow off” excess carbon dioxide, respiratory insufficiency, lesions in the respiratory control center of the brain, and salicylate poisoning. See also hyperpnea and hyperventilation.
transient tachypnea of the newborn a self-limited elevation of the respiratory rate in newborns due to delayed clearing of fetal lung water.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tach·yp·ne·a

(tak-ip-nē'ă), In the diphthong pn, the p is silent only at the beginning of a word. Although tachypne'a is the correct pronunciation, the alternative pronunciation tachyp'nea is widespread in the U.S.
Rapid breathing.
Synonym(s): polypnea
[tachy- + G. pnoē (pnoiē), breathing]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tachypnea

(tăk′ĭp-nē′ə, tăk′ĭ-nē′ə)
n.
Rapid breathing.

tach′yp·ne′ic adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tachypnea

Medtalk Abnormally fast breathing. Cf Dyspnea.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tach·y·pne·a

(tak'ip-nē'ă)
Rapid breathing (i.e., 20 breaths/min).
Synonym(s): polypnea, tachypnoea.
[tachy- + G. pnoē (pnoiē), breathing]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

tach·y·pne·a

(tak'ip-nē'ă)
Rapid breathing.
[tachy- + G. pnoē (pnoiē), breathing]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The common symptoms noted in acyanotic heart disease were respiratory distress, lethargy and reluctance to feed while tachypnea, hepatomegaly and murmur were most frequent signs.
The lungs are usually the most affected organs with rapidly progressing tachypnea and hypoxemia as the primary clinical symptoms [3,6].
Vitals were significant for hypothermia (temperature of 34.8[degrees]C) and worsening tachypnea to 90 breaths per minute.
The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) has only recommended antenatal corticosteroids up to 34th weeks of gestation.4 However, the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (RCOG) recommends routine administration of antenatal glucocorticoids for all women at risk of preterm birth up to and including pregnancies between 34+6 and 38+6 weeks of gestation.5 The latter recommendation is based on the Antenatal Steroids for Term Caesarean Section (ASTECS) trial, which has reported a reduction in the overall incidence of respiratory problems in the group treated with betamethasone (composite of transient tachypnea of the newborn and respiratory distress syndrome 2.4 vs 5.1%; RR 0.46, 95% CI 0.23-0.93).6
The most common reason for admission was preterm/low birth weight (PT/LBW) 48.43% followed by neonatal sepsis 19.61%, RDS 7.25%, neonatal jaundice 6.37%, meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) 5.20%, birth asphyxia (BAS) 5%, transient tachypnea of newborn (TTN) 3.92%, congenital malformations 2.65%, infant of diabetic mother 0.88%, neonatal seizures 0.59% and hemorrhagic disease of newborn 0.10%.
The correlation of basic hemodynamic status showed that despite verbal denial of elevated blood pressures, 47% had elevated BP, tachypnea, mild tachycardia without fever.
Cough, dyspnea, tachypnea, and hypoxemia signify sudden onset pulmonary symptoms.
A recent meta-analysis of 3 trials including 3,200 women at high risk for preterm delivery at 34 0/7 to 36 6/7 weeks of gestation reported that the corticosteroid administration reduced newborn risk for transient tachypnea of the newborn (relative risk [RR], 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.56-0.92), severe respiratory distress syndrome (RR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.33-0.94), and use of surfactant (RR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38-0.99).
The study was conducted considering the fact that many buffaloes (mostly in late pregnancies) in month of mid June to mid September (hot and humid weather) were reported (higher center) having elevated rectal temperature (103.5 [degrees]F-107 [degrees]F) and tachypnea despite therapy done by other Veterinarians.
Suddenly, clinical deterioration occurred, involving respiratory distress, increased needs of oxygen therapy, tachypnea, bradycardia, desaturations, and frequent apnea episodes, that required intubation and mechanical ventilation (MAP 12 cm[H.sub.2]O, FI[O.sub.2] 0.50).
In the ED, she was dehydrated with tachycardia and tachypnea (fast heart rate and breathing) but was not hypoxemic (low blood oxygen level).
Signs like pyrexia, tachycardia, hypotension, tachypnea, and bleeding diathesis were more common in malaria positive cases, but the difference was not statistically significant.