tachistoscope

(redirected from tachistoscopic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

ta·chis·to·scope

(tă-kis'tŏ-skōp),
An instrument to determine the shortest time necessary for an object to be perceived.
[G. tachistos, very rapid, fr. tachys, rapid, + skopeō, to view]

tachistoscope

(tă-kĭs′tə-skōp′, tə-)
n.
An apparatus that projects a series of images onto a screen at rapid speed to test visual perception, memory, and learning.

ta·chis′to·scop′ic (-skŏp′ĭk) adj.

tachistoscope

[təkis′təskōp′]
Etymology: Gk, tachistos, rapid, skopein, to view
a device used to increase the speed of visual perception by displaying visual stimuli only extremely briefly.

tachistoscope 

An instrument that presents visual stimuli for a brief and variable period of time (usually less than 0.1 s).
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
If James Vicary's account of his tachistoscopic experiment is the founding narrative of subliminal advertising, the equivalent position in the chronology of motivation research--as recounted by Samuel--is occupied by a story about Paul Lazarsfeld.
James Vicary's announcement of his tachistoscopic test occurred in September of that year.
Inhibition and tachistoscopic thresholds for sexually charged words.
Participants were never solicited according to handedness of relatives, but they were typically solicited for participation via separate sign-up sheets for left sod right-handed participants since studies often concerned possible differences between dextrals' and sinistrals' performances on lateralized tachistoscopic or dichotic listening tasks.
Tachistoscopic training was routinely used during World War II in training aircrews for aircraft recognition.
Each channel consists of a standard Kodak Ektagraphic III B slide projector fitted with a tachistoscopic shutter.
The role of articulation in the parsing and retention of letter strings in tachistoscopic free recall.
Cross modality facilitation in tachistoscopic word recognition.
Evidence for the importance of the initial letters in words comes from the tachistoscopic studies of Bruner & O'Dowd (1958).