tachistoscope

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ta·chis·to·scope

(tă-kis'tŏ-skōp),
An instrument to determine the shortest time necessary for an object to be perceived.
[G. tachistos, very rapid, fr. tachys, rapid, + skopeō, to view]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tachistoscope

(tă-kĭs′tə-skōp′, tə-)
n.
An apparatus that projects a series of images onto a screen at rapid speed to test visual perception, memory, and learning.

ta·chis′to·scop′ic (-skŏp′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tachistoscope 

An instrument that presents visual stimuli for a brief and variable period of time (usually less than 0.1 s).
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
Acland is skeptical about the effectiveness of subliminal advertising, but he notes that there is a small body of academic research that has tested both tachistoscopic and camouflaged persuasion and found weak support for each (see Messaris, 1997, pp.
If James Vicary's account of his tachistoscopic experiment is the founding narrative of subliminal advertising, the equivalent position in the chronology of motivation research--as recounted by Samuel--is occupied by a story about Paul Lazarsfeld.
James Vicary's announcement of his tachistoscopic test occurred in September of that year.
And yet Dichter's business was a great success, despite the accusations, whereas Vicary's attempt to build a business based on tachistoscopic advertising failed.
Lazarus (1954) and Eriksen (1954) argue that the threatening words used in the studies were not low frequency words, and Eriksen (1954) establishes that a word must be of extremely low frequency to have an effect on a tachistoscopic task.
Inhibition and tachistoscopic thresholds for sexually charged words.
Each channel consists of a standard Kodak Ektagraphic III B slide projector fitted with a tachistoscopic shutter.
The role of articulation in the parsing and retention of letter strings in tachistoscopic free recall.
Cross modality facilitation in tachistoscopic word recognition.
Evidence for the importance of the initial letters in words comes from the tachistoscopic studies of Bruner & O'Dowd (1958).
Scanning and the familiarity effect in tachistoscopic recognition.