taboo

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taboo

 [tah-boo´]
1. any of the negative traditions, objects, or behaviors generally regarded as harmful to social welfare and therefore prohibited.
2. excluded from use; prohibited.

ta·boo

, tabu (tă-bū'),
Restricted, prohibited, or forbidden; set apart for religious or ceremonial purposes.
[Tongan, set apart]

taboo

[təbo̅o̅′]
something that is forbidden by a society as unacceptable or improper. Incest is a taboo common to many societies.

taboo

Sociology A culture-specific ban on certain actions–eg, adultery among intimate friends, behaviors–eg, incest and thoughts, the abrogation of which results in reproof, persecution, or exile by members of the group

ta·boo

, tabu (tab-ū')
Restricted, prohibited, or forbidden; set apart for religious or ceremonial purposes.
[Tongan, set apart]
References in periodicals archive ?
This type of taboos, as Saville-Troike (2003) points out, occurs in multilingual contexts, where an acceptable word in one language sounds like one which is taboo in another.
Can't the taboo against talking about both be broken?
Perhaps one of the best examples of a campaignslowlychippingawayata taboo topic is the autism campaign runningintheUAE.
On the occasion Whisper, a leading fem care brand pledged to educate 15 million girls about the menstruation cycle by 2017, and break the various taboos prevailing in Indian society.
In this part by using the division of different classification of taboo words made by Nada Qanbar, researcher is going to enlighten different strategies used to translate and present them in table.
Asking them why they believed it was taboo to raise twins, the journalists got a troubling response.
From a taboo standpoint they are ostracised--it's an awkward situation to be in if you are having your monthly period and you simply do not want to be seen by others because they may perceive you as either dirty or unhygienic in some way," said Chris Williams, executive Director of WSSCC.
Even then--I have to wonder whether this sleek minimalism itself is proof that the advertisers could not overcome universally held taboos on the topic--or whether it is a genius lampoon on the shame which surrounds the "event.
Both Harris and Douglas touched on points that are, I think, reasons behind the taboo, but they don't explain the venom with which Israelites and later Jews have viewed pigs for millennia.
Economy Minister Philipp Roesler, who leads the junior coalition party the Free Democrats in Chancellor Angela Merkel's centre-right government, said earlier on Monday that to stabilise the euro there could "no longer be any taboos.
The use of an Africana womanist approach to analyse taboos and the African woman might sound a bit odd, but if we consider the historical background of Africana womanism as a theory and its major purpose one is then able to see the relevance of the theory to this particular field.