sucrose

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sucrose

 [soo´krōs]
a disaccharide obtained from sugar cane, sugar beet, or other sources; used as a food and sweetening agent.
sucrose hemolysis test a test for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria; the patient's whole blood is mixed with isotonic sucrose solution, which promotes binding of complement to red blood cells, then incubated and examined for hemolysis; greater than 10 per cent hemolysis indicates paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

su·crose

(sū'krōs),
A nonreducing disaccharide made up of d-glucose and d-fructose obtained from sugar cane, Saccharum officinarum (family Gramineae), from several species of sorghum, and from the sugar beet, Beta vulgaris (family Chenopodiaceae); the common sweetener, used in pharmacy in the manufacture of products such as syrup and confections.
Synonym(s): saccharose, saccharum

sucrose

/su·crose/ (soo´krōs) a disaccharide of glucose and fructose from sugar cane, sugar beet, or other sources; used as a food and sweetening agent and pharmaceutical aid.
Enlarge picture
Sucrose.

sucrose

(so͞o′krōs′)
n.
A crystalline disaccharide of fructose and glucose, C12H22O11, extracted chiefly from sugarcane and sugar beets and commonly known as table sugar. Also called saccharose.

sucrose

[so̅o̅′krōs]
Etymology: Fr, sucre, sugar
a disaccharide sugar derived from sugar cane, sugar beets, and sorghum and made up of one molecule of glucose and one of fructose joined together in a glycosidic linkage.

su·crose

(sū'krōs)
A nonreducing disaccharide made up of d-glucose and d-fructose obtained from sugar cane, Saccharum officinarum (family Gramineae), from several species of sorghum, and from the sugar beet, Beta vulgaris (family Chenopodiaceae); the common sweetener, table sugar, used in the manufacture of syrup and confections.
Synonym(s): saccharose.

sucrose

Cane or beet sugar. A crystalline disaccharide carbohydrate present in many foodstuffs and widely used as a sweetener and preservative. During digestion, sucrose hydrolyses to glucose and fructose.

sucrose

a DISACCHARIDE nonreducing sugar used in sweetening, being obtained from the juice of the sugar cane and from sugar beet. Sucrose (C12H22O11) is formed by a CONDENSATION REACTION between FRUCTOSE and GLUCOSE and can be broken down by acid hydrolysis or incubation with the enzyme sucrase.

sucrose,

n C12H22O11, a sugar whose source is sugarcane or sugarbeet, commonly found in solid preparations.

su·crose

(sū'krōs)
Common sweetener, used in pharmacy in manufacture of products such as syrup and confections.

sucrose

a sugar obtained from sugar cane, sugar beet, or other sources; used as a food and sweetening agent. Digestion is by sucrase secreted in the succus entericus. The feeding of large amounts to newborn and very young animals will cause osmotic diarrhea because of failure to hydrolyze the sugar. Overfeeding of ruminants with sucrose, or molasses, its crude form, causes carbohydrate engorgement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Honey is considered as the best alternative to table sugar and artificial sweeteners.
When the researchers fed mice sugar in doses proportional to what many people eat, the fructoseglucose mixture found in highfructose corn syrup was more toxic than sucrose or table sugar, reducing both the reproduction and lifespan of female rodents, the findings showed.
Compared to honey and table sugar, the jaggery gets dissolved in the body slowly.
Nonetheless, sugar producers are seeking to halt an advertising campaign launched by the Corn Refiners Association (CRA) that claims HFCS is nutritionally equivalent to table sugar.
Eating one cup of raisins metabolizes into the blood sugar equivalent of 26 teaspoons of table sugar.
Furthermore, many artificial sweeteners are derived from completely natural sources, while what we think of as all-natural often isn't quite: table sugar is of course heavily refined, but so are many "natural" sweeteners--even agave nectar.
Even when rats were given much lower concentrations of the commercial sweetener than are found in soda, while other rats were given higher concentrations of table sugar, the corn-syrup rats gained more weight.
You Will Need: a hummingbird feeder (clean with hot water, NO SOAP) 4 cups of water 1 cup of white table sugar medium-sized saucepan large spoon (wooden, if possible) 1.
Fructose, found in table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup, can increase uric acid, which may lead to or contribute to painful gouty arthritis.
The A-Z of fashion makes sure you can't get it wrong on a shopping trip and there are tips and advice on everything from how to make your perfume last longer to the best exfoliator - table sugar apparently.
It's 600 times as sweet as ordinary table sugar and has no calories.