sucrose

(redirected from table sugar)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sucrose

 [soo´krōs]
a disaccharide obtained from sugar cane, sugar beet, or other sources; used as a food and sweetening agent.
sucrose hemolysis test a test for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria; the patient's whole blood is mixed with isotonic sucrose solution, which promotes binding of complement to red blood cells, then incubated and examined for hemolysis; greater than 10 per cent hemolysis indicates paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

su·crose

(sū'krōs),
A nonreducing disaccharide made up of d-glucose and d-fructose obtained from sugar cane, Saccharum officinarum (family Gramineae), from several species of sorghum, and from the sugar beet, Beta vulgaris (family Chenopodiaceae); the common sweetener, used in pharmacy in the manufacture of products such as syrup and confections.
Synonym(s): saccharose, saccharum
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sucrose

(so͞o′krōs′)
n.
A crystalline disaccharide of fructose and glucose, C12H22O11, extracted chiefly from sugarcane and sugar beets and commonly known as table sugar. Also called saccharose.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

su·crose

(sū'krōs)
A nonreducing disaccharide made up of d-glucose and d-fructose obtained from sugar cane, Saccharum officinarum (family Gramineae), from several species of sorghum, and from the sugar beet, Beta vulgaris (family Chenopodiaceae); the common sweetener, table sugar, used in the manufacture of syrup and confections.
Synonym(s): saccharose.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sucrose

Cane or beet sugar. A crystalline disaccharide carbohydrate present in many foodstuffs and widely used as a sweetener and preservative. During digestion, sucrose hydrolyses to glucose and fructose.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

sucrose

a DISACCHARIDE nonreducing sugar used in sweetening, being obtained from the juice of the sugar cane and from sugar beet. Sucrose (C12H22O11) is formed by a CONDENSATION REACTION between FRUCTOSE and GLUCOSE and can be broken down by acid hydrolysis or incubation with the enzyme sucrase.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

su·crose

(sū'krōs)
Common sweetener, used in pharmacy in manufacture of products such as syrup and confections.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, researchers' investigation found that some products which are billed as containing honey actually have more table sugar in them.
"The amount added is often really small (1g or 2g) while the main sweetening ingredient continues to be other high-sugar syrups and table sugar (25g).
In contrast, table sugar (sucrose) is made of two chemically linked molecules, fructose and glucose, in about equal proportions.
They both are higher in calories than an equivalent amount of table sugar, although they are also sweeter, so it is possible to use less of them to achieve the same sweetness," says Rachel Lustgarten, RD, a dietitian at Weill Cornell's Center for Weight Management.
Table sugar has been an essential component of human diet.
"This is the most robust study showing there is a difference between highfructose corn syrup and table sugar at humanrelevant doses," said senior author of a new study Wayne Potts, professor at University of Utah in the US, Medical Xpress reported.
The suggested limits on intake of sugars in the draft guidelines apply to all monosaccharides (such as glucose and fructose) and disaccharides (such as sucrose or table sugar) that are added to food by the manufacturer, the cook or the consumer, as well as sugars that are naturally present in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit concentrates.
It is sweeter than table sugar, allowing users to consume fewer calories while enjoying the same flavour.
Experts recommend consuming a nutritious, low-fat diet that limits starches and refined carbohydrates linked to rapid rises in blood sugar levels (e.g., breads and pastas made with white flour, table sugar, and sweets).
Next came 2 cups of regular white table sugar with enough lukewarm water to dissolve it into the mix.
For the record, table sugar is sucrose, which is half fructose and half glucose.
What You Need: * 1 cup white whole-wheat flour * 1 cup all-purpose flour * 3 teaspoons baking powder * 1/2 teaspoon salt O 1/3 cup sugar * 1 egg * 1/4 cup unsweetened applesauce * 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons low-fat milk * 1 teaspoon vanilla extract * 1 tablespoon lemon or orange zest * 1 cup unsweetened frozen strawberries, thawed and chopped * Turbinado sugar or table sugar Adult: Preheat oven to 375[degrees]F.