tabanid


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

tabanid

 [tab´ah-nid]
a biting insect of the family Tabanidae, including the horseflies and deerflies.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tab·a·nid

(tab'ă-nid),
Common name for flies of the family Tabanidae.
[L. tabanus, gadfly]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tabanid

(tə-bā′nĭd, -băn′ĭd)
n.
Any of various bloodsucking dipteran flies of the family Tabanidae, which includes the horseflies and deerflies.

ta·ba′nid adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tab·a·nid

(tab'ă-nid)
Common name for flies of the family Tabanidae.
[L. tabanus, gadfly]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Whatever the mechanism (a more competent immune system or a lower probability of encountering an infected tabanid fly), dominant males do exhibit a lower prevalence of infection.
While the distribution of tsetse flies in Africa is well known, the researchers did not have maps of tabanids (horseflies, deer flies).
Tabanid vectors of the arterial nematode, Elaeophora schneideri, in southwestern Montana.
Arthropods such as hard ticks, tabanid flies, mosquitoes, and fleas are important vectors of infection among vertebrates.
While the tabanid flies we captured at one site in the northern mountains clearly act as pollinators, they do not have sufficiently long proboscides to account for the evolution of spurs up to 72 mm in length in some populations in this region.
Trypanosomiasis was originally an enzootic disease circulating in wild animals such as mammals and birds and spread by biting tabanid flies.
theileri Cattle Worldwide (transmitted by tabanid flies) Try.
1977, 1980, 1990, Travis and Vargas 1978, Fallas and Vargas 1981, Vargas and Ramirez 1988,Vargas and Vargas 1997 Ceratopogonid flies Vargas 1960 Tabanid flies Fairchild 1961, Hogue and Fairchild 1974 Human bot fly Zeledon 1956b, 1957b TABLE 2 Representative papers on bees published in the Revista de Biologia Tropical during the first 50 years of the journal Colletidae, Andrenidae Gaglianone 2000, Genaro 2001.
Field isolates from tabanid fly guts were screened, cloned by multiple liquid dilution cloning and/or sero-cloned, re-screened, and deformation tested to produce serological profiles.
Anautogenous tabanid females ingest blood by lacerating the skin with serrated mouthparts and lapping up the pooled blood, which can cause significant irritation to the host.