systolic pressure


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sys·tol·ic pres·sure

the intracardiac pressure during or resulting from systolic contraction of a cardiac chamber; the highest arterial blood pressure reached during any given ventricular cycle.

systolic pressure

n.
The highest arterial blood pressure reached when the ventricles are contracting.

sys·tol·ic pres·sure

(sis-tol'ik presh'ŭr)
The intracardiac pressure during or resulting from systolic contraction of a cardiac chamber; the highest arterial blood pressure reached during any given ventricular cycle.

sys·tol·ic pres·sure

(sis-tol'ik presh'ŭr)
Intracardiac pressure during or resulting from systolic contraction of a cardiac chamber; highest arterial blood pressure reached during any given ventricular cycle. Also called systolic blood pressure.
References in periodicals archive ?
restenosis, new onset AF in patients with previous normal sinus rhythm and worsening Mitral regurgitation were excluded so that they may not affect our study in terms of right ventricular systolic pressure. However there are some patients whose right ventricular systolic functions either does not improve or continue to progress in spite of successful PTMC, such a phenomenon has been described by Inci S, et al, which conclude that because of irreversible changes in the pulmonary vascular bed in a group of patients with pulmonary hypertension in whom there is a pseudo improvement for a given time due to the decreased post-PTMC after load.16
Both males and females showed a rise in systolic pressure to stress which was the CPT.
People with diabetes, a history of stroke, and institutionalized elderly people were not considered for the study, and aiming for a systolic pressure of 120 is not advisable.
The predictive value of systolic pressure variation is well attested to in ventilated patients.
If your systolic pressure is 140 or higher, ask your doctor how you can lower it.
With breathing, there is approximately a 3 to 4 mmHg difference in systolic pressure between inspiration and expiration due to changes in intrathoracic pressure (Darovic, 2002).
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute guidelines define high blood pressure as systolic pressure over 140 mmHg or diastolic pressure over 80 mmHg.
The ABI is a ratio calculated by comparing the highest systolic pressure found in the lower extremity to the highest systolic pressure found in the brachial artery of either upper extremity.
In the recent Vancouver study of 144 men with various levels of SCI, their systolic pressure was recorded in excess of 220 mmHg.
However, for the general population cardiovascular risk increases 30% for each 10 mm Hg rise in systolic pressure. (1)
At one extreme for these risk factors were women who were nonsmokers or ex-smokers, younger than 35, with no history of early preeclampsia, who had a systolic pressure at entry of 105 mm Hg or less, and who used folate starting prepregnancy.
Systolic pressure, a measurement of the contraction of the chambers of the heart, indicates the highest arterial blood pressure reached during a heartbeat.