fluoride

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fluoride

 [floor´īd]
any binary compound of fluorine.
fluoride poisoning a toxic condition that sometimes occurs with ingestion of excessive fluoride. Acute fluoride poisoning involves an immediate physiological reaction, with nausea, vomiting, hypersalivation, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Chronic fluoride poisoning is a physiological reaction to long term exposure to high levels of fluoride and is characterized by dental fluorosis, skeletal fluorosis, and kidney damage. Called also fluorosis.
systemic fluoride a fluoride ingested in water, supplements, or some other form. See also fluoridation.
topical fluoride a fluoride applied directly to the teeth, especially of children, in a dental caries prevention program.

fluor·ide

(flōr'īd),
1. A compound of fluorine with a metal, a nonmetal, or an organic radical.
2. The anion of fluorine; inhibits enolase; found in bone and tooth apatite; fluoride has a cariostatic effect; high levels are toxic.

fluor·ide

(flōr'īd)
A compound of fluorine with a metal, a nonmetal, or an organic radical; the anion of fluorine; inhibits enolase; found in bone and tooth apatite; fluoride has a cariostatic effect; high levels are toxic.

fluoride

a compound of fluorine that replaces hydroxyl groups in teeth and bones and reduces the tendency to tooth decay. Its therapeutic use was discovered accidentally at Bauxite, Arkansas, when water containing fluoride was replaced by water lacking fluoride, resulting in an increase of dental cavities in children. See FLUORIDATION, DENTAL CARIES.

Fluoride

A chemical compound containing fluorine that is used to treat water or applied directly to teeth to prevent decay.

fluor·ide

(flōr'īd)
1. A compound of fluorine with a metal, a nonmetal, or an organic radical.
2. The anion of fluorine; inhibits enolase; found in bone and tooth apatite; fluoride has a cariostatic effect; high levels are toxic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cities fluoridate water to 0.7 ppm or higher but do not announce that use of fluoride tablets should be discontinued or that systemic fluoride is a recognized neurotoxin in animals and man that accumulates abnormally and permanently into bone [8, 9].
Topical and systemic fluorides are known to be highly effective therapeutic components of a comprehensive caries prevention plan.
As a result of the combined efforts of dental and dental hygiene professionals and public health advocates in providing needed topical and systemic fluoride, remarkable progress has been made in caries prevention.
Good oral hygiene, daily use of topical and systemic fluoride, diet control and routine dental check-up are necessary to maintain optimal oral health (Wright, 1990).
Systemic Fluoride: According to current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, fluoride supplementation is recommended for high risk children living in non-fluoridated areas.
Objectives that address dental caries as a national problem are included in Healthy People 2000.[3] For example, objectives target reducing dental caries and tooth loss due to dental caries; increasing the proportion of children who have received sealants; and increasing exposure to water fluoridation and the use of professionally or self-administered topical or systemic fluorides. Dental hygienists can contribute to the achievement of these national health objectives.

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