systematist


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systematist

(sĭs′tə-mə-tĭst, sĭ-stĕm′ə-)
n.
1. A taxonomist.
2. One who adheres to or formulates a system or systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
[1987]), weevils have a more extensive infrastructure of resources for systematics, that is, collections, keys, checklists, and working systematists (see references in O'Brien and Wibmer 1982; Wibmer and O'Brien 1986, 1989).
"Baracktrema obamai will endure as long as there are systematists studying these remarkable organisms," Platt said in the (http://www.prweb.com/releases/Baracktrema_obamai/new_species/prweb13652333.htm) release.
Finally, a word on what is meant by "system." The Legal Realists saw themselves as systematists, but in a functionalist sense.
Mormotomyia hirsuta has long been of great interest to Diptera systematists and conservation biologists (Courtney et al.
Systematists, as well as taxonomists, identify, describe, and classify organisms.
In the past, Marshallia has been an intractable genus for systematists. Its closely related lineages and species share a number of genetic and morphological similarities that have obfuscated the phylogeny of this beautiful genus.
Solving the relationships among taxa in complexes that have experienced these phenomena presents a unique challenge for systematists, and an opportunity to increase our understanding of phylogenetic conflict and the historical processes it represents (Sessa et al.
Although most fungal systematists can readily distinguish Clavariadelphus from other clavarioid, cantharelloid, craterelloid or gomphoid members of Aphyllophorales (Donk, 1933; Corner, 1950, 1970; Wells and Kempton 1968; Petersen, 1972; Petersen et al., 1974), delimitation of infrageneric taxa has been proven difficult in many cases.
Many systematists like me practice taxonomy (the naming of new species) and piece together what scientists call the "tree of life." All organisms are related to each other, and we can make educated guesses about their history.
These species, which are widespread in Turkey, are mistaken for each other by butterfly systematists as well as by amateur butterfly watchers.
It is assumed that these habitats host plants whose ancestors occupy a basal position in the phylogeny of their respective groups, thus some systematists argue that the taxa diverged long ago, and the rupicolous floras are relict communities.