syringe exchange program


Also found in: Acronyms.

needle exchange program

Any program intended to slow the spread of AIDS (and hepatitis C) among IV drug abusers (IVDAs), in which a governmental or charitable agency exchanges sterile needles for dirty, potentially contaminated needles used by IVDAs when injecting (“shooting”) heroin or other substances.

syringe exchange program

Needle exchange program, see there.
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Additionally, since it began, the Louisville Metro Syringe Exchange Program has:
State laws that increase access to syringe exchange programs and clean needles and syringes, and policies that facilitate access to HCV treatment through state Medicaid programs can reduce HCV transmission risk.
Preventing HIV transmission among injection drug users: A brief history of syringe exchange programs.
For example, pneumococcal and influenza vaccination was accepted by 86% of IDUs at a syringe exchange program in New York City [5].
Syringe exchange programs increase safe disposal of used syringes and provide opportunities to engage with active drug users on prevention, treatment, and safety strategies.
Certain communities have rejected syringe exchange programs because of misconceptions about the organizations.
Since the 1980's, syringe exchange programs have proliferated at the local level.
The same study further showed a rise in the average (median) age of injectors presenting at Syringe Exchange programs from 27.
Just as San Franciscans responded in a timely and creative way to prevent high rates of HIV infection among drug injectors and their partners through early implementation of syringe exchange programs, a similarly urgent strategy must be employed to counteract the dramatic increases in heroin overdoses, (1) while continuing to expand sterile injection equipment accessibility to prevent HIV and hepatitis C infections.
surgeon general, observed in 2000 that, `After reviewing all of the research to date, the senior scientists of the department and I have unanimously agreed that there is conclusive scientific evidence that syringe exchange programs, as part of a comprehensive HIV prevention strategy, are an effective public health intervention that reduces the transmission of HIV and does not encourage the use of illegal drugs.
In 2002, the number of syringe exchange programs in the United States, the number of states with such programs, and public funding for the programs decreased for the first time in 8 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Given that the major route of HCV transmission is via IDU, hepatitis C will continue to spread until injection equipment is widely available through pharmacy sale and syringe exchange programs.