syntropy


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Related to syntropy: Negative entropy

syntropy

 [sin´trah-pe]
the state of being syntropic.

syn·tro·py

(sin'trō-pē),
1. The tendency sometimes seen in two diseases to coalesce into one.
2. The state of harmonious association with others.
3. In anatomy, a number of similar structures inclined in one general direction; for example, the spinous processes of a series of vertebrae, the ribs.
[syn- + G. tropē, a turning]

syn·tro·py

(sin'trŏ-pē)
1. The tendency sometimes seen in two diseases to coalesce into one.
2. The state of harmonious association with others.
3. anatomy A number of similar structures inclined in one general direction (e.g., the spinous processes of a series of vertebrae, the ribs).
[syn- + G. tropē, a turning]

syn·tro·py

(sin'trŏ-pē)
1. Tendency sometimes seen in two diseases to coalesce.
2. In anatomy, number of similar structures inclined in one general direction.
[syn- + G. tropē, a turning]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Shlaer and Mellor, Syntropy, and Octopus introduce the concept of a subsystem as a way of partitioning a large system into simpler parts.
[1987] describe the solution used in SDL92 and Cook and Daniels [1994] define the solution used in Syntropy. However, it is safe to say that a satisfactory solution has not yet been found.
Syntropy [Cook and Daniels 1994] is a combination of OMT and statecharts, extended with some other notations from Booch, all given a precise semantics by means of the formal specification language Z [Spivey 1989].
Syntropy distinguishes the essential model, the specification model, and the implementation model of a software system.
The term "essential model" in Syntropy should not be confused with the same term as used in Structured Analysis.
The specification model of Syntropy describes the states that the software can be in and the way that it responds to stimuli by changing state and producing responses.
To build a specification model, the system boundary must be defined by defining external entities, called agents in Syntropy. These may be modeled as part of the essential model.
To manage complexity, Syntropy partitions the software into subsystems called domains.