synthesize

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synthesize

 [sin´thĕ-sīz″]
to produce by synthesis.

syn·the·size

(sin'thĕ-sīz),
To make something by synthesis, that is, synthetically.

synthesize

(sĭn′thĭ-sīz′)
v. synthe·sized, synthe·sizing, synthe·sizes
v.tr.
To form or produce by chemical synthesis.

synthesize

[sin′thəsīz]
Etymology: Gk, synthesis, putting together
to form by building, as in the formation of complex chemical compounds such as proteins from simpler units of amino acids.

syn·the·size

(sin'thĕ-sīz)
To make something by synthesis, i.e., synthetically.

synthesize

to produce by synthesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the concept of synthesizing data is not new, a dedicated service of analyzing and modeling data from multiple market intelligence sources is unique due to the proprietary nature of syndicated data.
Beyond the traditional use of assertions in software simulation, synthesizing assertions into hardware opens a variety of possibilities.
In addition, scientists can now entertain the possibility of synthesizing complex molecules that have more than two enantiomers.
Presently, Locus Pharmaceuticals is synthesizing and testing novel, computationally predicted, drug candidates for the treatment of debilitating and life-threatening human diseases including HIV/AIDS, cancer and inflammation.
One current project, he says, focuses on synthesizing glycinoeclepin, a bioregulator made by some bean plants after about 40 chemical steps.
Noise performance is excellent, with noise spectral density of -158 dBm/Hz synthesizing a 300-MHz output.
On the other path, biochemists are synthesizing small pieces of antisense DNA in the laboratory that match known sequences of DNA.
Presently, Locus Pharmaceuticals is synthesizing and developing novel, computationally predicted, drug candidates for the treatment of debilitating and life-threatening human diseases including HIV/AIDS, cancer and inflammation.
Poon says aerospace companies already are capable of synthesizing aluminum-rich glasses using melt spinning, the technique both teams used to produce their alloys.
This feature is especially useful for synthesizing the largest ASIC designs, which can now be prototyped all at once and are limited only by the memory available on their workstation.
In the race to find better ways of combining elements such as yttrium, barium, copper and oxygen to make high-temperature superconductors, that thought has pushed many researchers to try a number of novel techniques for synthesizing these materials.