synthesis

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synthesis

 [sin´thĕ-sis]
1. the creation of an integrated whole by the combining of simpler parts or entities.
2. the formation of a chemical compound by the union of its elements or from other suitable components.
3. in psychiatry, the integration of the various elements of the personality. adj., adj synthet´ic.
synthesis of learning the restructuring of previously learned concepts and behaviors into new patterns.

syn·the·sis

, pl.

syn·the·ses

(sin'thĕ-sis, -sēz),
1. A building up, putting together, composition.
2. In chemistry, the formation of compounds by the union of simpler compounds or elements.
3. Stage in the cell cycle in which DNA is synthesized as a preliminary to cell division.
[G. fr. syn, together, + thesis, a placing, arranging]

synthesis

(sĭn′thĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. synthe·ses (-sēz′)
1.
a. The combining of separate elements or substances to form a coherent whole.
b. The complex whole so formed.
2. Chemistry Formation of a compound from simpler compounds or elements.
3. Philosophy
a. Reasoning from the general to the particular; logical deduction.
b. The combination of thesis and antithesis in the Hegelian dialectical process whereby a new and higher level of truth is produced.

syn′the·sist n.

synthesis

The creation of a whole from simpler parts or components. See Biosynthesis, Cell-free synthesis, Combinatorial biosynthesis, Coordinated enzyme synthesis, Narcosynthesis, Parallel synthesis, Psychosynthesis, Split synthesis.

syn·the·sis

, pl. syntheses (sin'thĕ-sis, -sēz)
1. Generally, the process of building up, putting together, or composing.
2. chemistry The formation of compounds by the union of simpler compounds or elements.
3. The stage in the cell cycle in which DNA is synthesized as a preliminary to cell division.
[syn- + thesis, a placing, arranging]

synthesis

see ANABOLISM.

syn·the·sis

, pl. syntheses (sin'thĕ-sis, -sēz)
1. A composition.
2. In chemistry, formation of compounds by union of simpler compounds or elements.
[syn- + thesis, a placing, arranging]
References in periodicals archive ?
This is not to imply that the synthesist will want to call up only these writings; obviously that could be foolishly parochial.
People with a strong preference for synthesist thinking may ignore agreement even when it exists.
Ian Body is one of the UK's leading independent synthesists. He runs the ambient electronica label DiN, writes music for TV/film and radio and has released over 30 albums in a 25-year music career.
Synthesists must analyze studies in sufficient detail to preserve the integrity of each study and yet not become so immersed in detail that no usable synthesis is produced" (Sandelowski et al., 1996, p.
In particular, I think both sets of research synthesists would agree with the following findings of the research:
Richard Niebuhr's distinctions among synthesists who seek to reconcile Christ and the (existing) law, conversionists who seek to transform the law through Christ, separatists who believe that Christ necessarily stands against the positive law of any state, and dualists who see Christ and the law in creative tension.
But Select magazine, marking the album five out of five, said: "Oasis are clearly the finest rock synthesists the world has known.
It is not just synthesists who are affected; anyone who spends time performing, arranging, composing, recording, or simply listening to music comes in contact with this recent digital technology.
If most of the synthesists eventually grasped Mayr's point about the centrality of speciation as a problem in evolutionary dynamics, almost no one followed him to the next crucial step of recognizing a constitutive role for speciation as the creative and formative force in macroevolution.
Clergyman, novelist, poet, social activist, and erstwhile natural historian, Charles Kingsley--though hardly Victorian England's most remarkable polymath--surely ranks as one of the period's most earnest synthesists.(3) As a populist, Kingsley devoted much of his energy to the idealistic attempt, at mid-century, to make all things work for all people.
169), enters into the controversy regarding the didactic portions of the Mahabharata, between the "analysts" represented almost solely by Joseph Dahlmann, and the "synthesists" or "excavationists" such as E.