syntactic

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syntactic

adjective Referring to the order, format and content of clinical trial data and/or documents, which contrasts to the trial’s semantics.

syntactic

(sĭn-tăk′tĭk)
Concerning or affecting syntax.
References in periodicals archive ?
Number of Syntactically (and Semantically) Similar Configuration Options across the Three Web Browsers per Category.
61) be-PRS.3SG 'There is no brideal ransom, but there is money, he said' Another possibility to convey possessive relations in Obdorsk is to use a syntactically intransitive construction with the verb xajti 'remain':
Syntactically "you" could refer to either subject or object, though in context it needs to be interpreted as the latter: Beatrice, who is finally confessing her love for Benedick, should be construed as the agent of a gapped phrase, to the effect, "as much as I love you." Nevertheless, an alternative construal, to the effect, "as much as you love some unspecified person, or thing," was selected by a large minority of respondents.
The first list, which closes with the verb phrase "perfectly confounded me," contains only six items on the basic syntactic level: "l, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 confounded me." However, the individual items are not only enhanced by adjectival and postmodifier expansions ("wonderful," "of everything"), but by syntactically disguised subordinate clauses as in [4], where the dirty houses are described in a triple series of qualifiers: [4a] their vertical arrangement, [4b] their having passages which are derogatively compared to that emblem of London slums, St.
He also argues that certain participants that can be syntactically unexpressed (e.g.
Since Adyghe is typologically non-configurational, Nikolaeva explains quantification as syntactically discontinuous expressions.
A system is imagistic, if it is relatively replete, syntactically sensitive, semantically rich, and mimetic though not necessarily transparent, whereas picture or pictorial images are necessarily transport.
Other less convincing cases can be made for tests that show that idioms are often not syntactically fully formed, that is, the idiom can't be used in certain grammatical patterns.
Besides varying the characters' voices lexically, Pasternak individualized them phonetically, intonationally, rhythmically, and syntactically. Pasternak did not always closely follow Shakespeare in doing this; however, unlike the originals, the translations raise fewer doubts as to the distinction among individual voices, especially among the primary characters of Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, and King Lear.
Academic writing is usually dense, syntactically complex, verbose, and jargon-laden: Stylistically, it is the antithesis of usable dialogue design.