synostosis


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

synostosis

 [sin″os-to´sis]
normal or abnormal union of two bones by osseous material. adj., adj synostot´ic.

syn·os·to·sis

(sin'os-tō'sis), [TA]
Osseous union between two bones that are not supposed to be united; commonly refers to formation of a bony bundle between the radius and ulna following fracture of these two bones.
[syn- + G. osteon, bone, + -osis, condition]

synostosis

(sĭn′ŏs-tō′sĭs)
n. pl. synosto·ses (-sēz)
The fusion of normally separate skeletal bones.

syn′os·tot′ic (-tŏt′ĭk) adj.

syn·os·to·sis

, synosteosis (sin'os-tō'sis, -tē-ōsis) [TA]
Osseous union between the bones forming a joint.
Synonym(s): bony ankylosis, true ankylosis.

syn·os·to·sis

, synosteosis (sin-os'tō'sis, -tē-ōsis) [TA]
Osseous union between bones forming a joint.
Synonym(s): bony ankylosis, true ankylosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Radiographs demonstrated healed radial neck and olecranon fractures, and an extensive bony synostosis at the PRUJ (Figures 4(a) and 4(b)).
Craniosynostosis syndromes including Apert, Crouzon, Pfeiffer, Jackson-Weiss, and Beare-Stevenson syndromes, and FGFR2-related isolated coronal synostosis occur as a result of FGFR2 gene mutations localized in the 10q25.3-26 locus (2).
Metopic synostosis is a type of cranio synostosis, a deformity found in infants that changes the growth pattern in their skull.
These have also been found in SHS (DA2B) [4] and multiple pterygium syndrome (DA8) [22] and quite recently in autosomal dominant spondylocarpotarsal synostosis syndrome [23].
(2007) indicated that syndesmosis fixation through four cortices results in a greater risk of tibiofibular synostosis and motion restriction, when compared to three-cortex fixation [33].
A coalition, or bar, is a bony ("synostosis"), cartilaginous ("synchondrosis"), or fibrous ("syndesmosis") connection between two or more bones.
The foetal profile characterized by the nasal bone's synostosis, foetal lips and aligned maxilla and mandible was noted.
Sagittal synostosis is the most common phenotype, representing 40 percent to 55 percent of nonsyndromic cases.
The classic clinical triad of Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) -short neck, restricted neck mobility, and low dorsal hairline- is the result of congenital synostosis of a variable number of cervical vertebrae.
In human and veterinary medicine syndactyly has been classified into several types: simple, which affects only soft tissue; complex, involving synostosis; complete, involving entire length synostosis of the fused bones; incomplete, when synostosis does not comprise the entire bone length; complicated, when syndactyly appears with other malformations in the same individual; and uncomplicated if there are no more malformations [1-3].