synostosis

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synostosis

 [sin″os-to´sis]
normal or abnormal union of two bones by osseous material. adj., adj synostot´ic.

syn·os·to·sis

(sin'os-tō'sis), [TA]
Osseous union between two bones that are not supposed to be united; commonly refers to formation of a bony bundle between the radius and ulna following fracture of these two bones.
[syn- + G. osteon, bone, + -osis, condition]

synostosis

/syn·os·to·sis/ (-os-to´sis) pl. synosto´ses  
1. a union between adjacent bones or parts of a single bone formed by osseous material.
2. the osseous union of bones that are normally distinct.synostot´ic

synostosis

(sĭn′ŏs-tō′sĭs)
n. pl. synosto·ses (-sēz)
The fusion of normally separate skeletal bones.

syn′os·tot′ic (-tŏt′ĭk) adj.

synostosis

[sin′ostō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, syn, together, osteon, bone
the joining of two bones by the ossification of connecting tissues. It occurs normally in the fusion of cranial bones to form the skull.

syn·os·to·sis

, synosteosis (sin'os-tō'sis, -tē-ōsis) [TA]
Osseous union between the bones forming a joint.
Synonym(s): bony ankylosis, true ankylosis.

synostosis

bony union between two bones, with resultant loss of joint movement (see tarsal coalitions)

syn·os·to·sis

, synosteosis (sin-os'tō'sis, -tē-ōsis) [TA]
Osseous union between bones forming a joint.
Synonym(s): bony ankylosis, true ankylosis.

synostosis (sin´ōstō´sis),

n the joining of two bones by the ossification of connecting tissues. It occurs normally in the fusion of cranial bones to form the adult skull.

synostosis

pl. synostoses [Gr.] normal or abnormal union of two bones by osseous material.
Enlarge picture
Congenital metatarsal bone synostosis in a dog. By permission from Ettinger SJ, Feldman E, Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Saunders, 2004

radioulnar synostosis
occurs between the radius and ulna as a result of unsatisfactory reduction of fractures.
References in periodicals archive ?
All synostoses were excised, but a 50% recurrence rate was seen.
The classic indication for VEPTR as described by Campbell and colleagues (10) is for rib synostoses often associated with congenital spinal anomalies.
Evans noted that bridging bone in one plane is amenable to excision with good functional return and low recurrence rate, whereas synostoses in two or more planes showed diminished results.