synaesthesia

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synaesthesia

(sĭn′ĭs-thē′zhə)
n.
Variant of synesthesia.

syn·es·the·si·a

(sin'es-thē'zē-ă)
A condition in which a stimulus, in addition to exciting the usual and normally located sensation, gives rise to a subjective sensation of different character or localization, e.g., color hearing, color taste.
Synonym(s): synaesthesia.
[syn- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]

synaesthesia

The phenomenon in which stimulations of one sense modality produces the effect of stimulation of another. Thus, a person may consistently experience a particular letter of the alphabet, or a musical tone, as a particular colour.

synaesthesia 

Phenomenon in which the stimulation of one of the senses produces a response from another sensory modality. Example: seeing the colour red when a particular sound is heard. See modality.

syn·es·the·si·a

(sin'es-thē'zē-ă)
A condition in which a stimulus, in addition to exciting usual and normally located sensation, gives rise to a subjective sensation of different character.
Synonym(s): synaesthesia.
[syn- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]
References in periodicals archive ?
Going in we were actually predicting that synesthetes might have a more concrete style of thinking that does not emphasize conceptual-level relations between stimuli, given that they have very rigid parings between sensory experiences.
Researchers say women are twice as likely to have synesthesia, and that synesthetes often have artistic talents.
Once you're finished, turn the page upside-down to learn what a synesthete would see.
The University of Granada researchers remark that "not all healers are synesthetes, but there is a higher prevalence of this phenomenon among them.
To carry out this study, the researchers interviewed some synesthetes as the healer from Granada "Esteban Sanchez Casas", known as "El Santon de Baza".
She is a synesthete and the first journalist to have interviewed Itzhak Perlman, Billy Joel, and the family of Marilyn Monroe about their synesthesia.
Unlike normal subjects, synesthetes correctly reported the shape formed by groups of numbers up to 90 percent of the time (exactly as nonsynesthetes do when the numbers actually have different colors).
Visual artists are possibly the most practiced synesthetes.
When synesthetes were compared with matched controls, this was only significantly different for smell related imagery, although the difference approached significance for the extent to which one felt as though they were re- or pre-experiencing life events.
Among synesthetes, he found that, compared with controls, flow throughout the brain was reduced during sensory stimulation; the greatest reduction was in the blood going to the cortex, where sensory sensations are normally processed.
Reports of the strength of visual images varied widely among participants, but synesthetes were strikingly better at not just seeing movement, but also experiencing clear visual form.
In basic neurological terms, synesthesia is thought to be due to cross-wiring in the brain of some people (synesthetes); in other words, synesthetes present more synaptic connections than "normal" people.