synaesthesia

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synaesthesia

(sĭn′ĭs-thē′zhə)
n.
Variant of synesthesia.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

syn·es·the·si·a

(sin'es-thē'zē-ă)
A condition in which a stimulus, in addition to exciting the usual and normally located sensation, gives rise to a subjective sensation of different character or localization, e.g., color hearing, color taste.
Synonym(s): synaesthesia.
[syn- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

synaesthesia

The phenomenon in which stimulations of one sense modality produces the effect of stimulation of another. Thus, a person may consistently experience a particular letter of the alphabet, or a musical tone, as a particular colour.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

synaesthesia 

Phenomenon in which the stimulation of one of the senses produces a response from another sensory modality. Example: seeing the colour red when a particular sound is heard. See modality.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

syn·es·the·si·a

(sin'es-thē'zē-ă)
A condition in which a stimulus, in addition to exciting usual and normally located sensation, gives rise to a subjective sensation of different character.
Synonym(s): synaesthesia.
[syn- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
One synesthete who spoke to Medical News Today gave us a highly impressive description of her experience of color-auditory synaesthesia.
"Going in we were actually predicting that synesthetes might have a more concrete style of thinking that does not emphasize conceptual-level relations between stimuli, given that they have very rigid parings between sensory experiences.
Researchers say women are twice as likely to have synesthesia, and that synesthetes often have artistic talents.
The University of Granada researchers remark that "not all healers are synesthetes, but there is a higher prevalence of this phenomenon among them.
She is a synesthete and the first journalist to have interviewed Itzhak Perlman, Billy Joel, and the family of Marilyn Monroe about their synesthesia.
Internet resources now available to synesthetes include not only association sites (and associations in Australia, Belgium, and the U.K.), but also online communities, articles, and reports from both popular and scientific publications, personal Web sites created by synesthetes to share their experiences, and even interactive tests that can determine synesthetic abilities.
Visual artists are possibly the most practiced synesthetes. Their form of communication is almost always a reckoning between their thoughts and visual media.
There was no evidence for ESP in the group as a whole, or among the controls or synesthetes; the overall effect size was d= .05, the effect size for the controls was d = -.014 and that for the synesthetes was d = -.00.
After finding three more auditory synesthetes, she realized her dot video was synesthetically "loud." When she asked if it made a sound, one of the synesthetes responded, "How could it not?" This answer may signal why auditory synesthesia hadn't been detected by neurobiologists.
Synesthetes are people with a brain condition that leads to a hallucinatory welding of senses.
Known as synesthetes, these individuals may, for example, see colors when they hear music or even taste sounds.
In basic neurological terms, synesthesia is thought to be due to cross-wiring in the brain of some people (synesthetes); in other words, synesthetes present more synaptic connections than "normal" people.