synesthesia


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synesthesia

 [sin″es-the´zhah]
a secondary sensation accompanying an actual perception; the experiencing of a sensation in one place, due to stimulation applied to another place; also, the condition in which a stimulus of one sense is perceived as sensation of a different sense, as when a sound produces a sensation of color.

syn·es·the·si·a

(sin'es-thē'zē-ă),
1. A condition in which a stimulus, in addition to exciting the usual and normally located sensation, gives rise to a subjective sensation of different character or localization; for example, color hearing, color taste.
2. From a neurolinguistic perspective, stimulus-response conditioning such as seen in a phobia.
[syn- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]

synesthesia

/syn·es·the·sia/ (sin″es-the´zhah)
1. a secondary sensation accompanying an actual perception.
2. a dysesthesia in which a stimulus of one sense is perceived as sensation of a different sense, as when a sound produces a sensation of color.
3. a dysesthesia in which a stimulus to one part of the body is experienced as being at a different location.

synesthesia

also

synaesthesia

(sĭn′ĭs-thē′zhə)
n.
1. A condition in which one type of stimulation evokes the sensation of another, as when the hearing of a sound produces the visualization of a color.
2. A sensation felt in one part of the body as a result of stimulus applied to another, as in referred pain.
3. The description of one kind of sense impression by using words that normally describe another.

syn′es·thet′ic (-thĕt′ĭk) adj.

synesthesia

[sin′esthē′zhə]
a phenomenon in which sensations of two or more modalities accompany one another, as when a visual sensation is experienced when a particular sound is heard. Also called secondary sensation.

syn·es·the·si·a

(sin'es-thē'zē-ă)
A condition in which a stimulus, in addition to exciting the usual and normally located sensation, gives rise to a subjective sensation of different character or localization, e.g., color hearing, color taste.
Synonym(s): synaesthesia.
[syn- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]

syn·es·the·si·a

(sin'es-thē'zē-ă)
A condition in which a stimulus, in addition to exciting usual and normally located sensation, gives rise to a subjective sensation of different character.
Synonym(s): synaesthesia.
[syn- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]
References in periodicals archive ?
The research centered on measuring the extent that people with Synesthesia draw meaning between words.
To understand how Padgett acquired his savant skills with mathematical synesthesia, Berit Brogaard, a philosophy professor now at the University of Miami, in Coral Gables, Florida, and her colleagues used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and scanned his brain.
In contrast, 19 percent of people with autism appeared to have synesthesia, according to the study published yesterday (Nov 19) in the journal Molecular Autism.
She said her synesthesia is helpful when trying to remember long streams of numbers or words, and it also gives her a better understanding of physics and mechanical designs.
Imagine a world in which numbers have color, musical sounds shimmer like rainbows, and words have taste and texture; this is the world of those with synesthesia, and it might be your world or that of someone you know.
Synesthesia is an abnormal response from one sensory system when another sensory system is stimulated eg a sound may be "heard" as a colour.
Edmund White: A person who is capable of synesthesia might see colors in the sounds of vowels or in listening to music.
Finally, and this may be the most important point of all, Deleuze, Altered States and Film slowly develops an argument--almost in the background as it were--for the importance of the function of synesthesia in motion pictures.
The Norwegian singer, who suffers from synesthesia and sees colours when she hears music, commanded the room throughout the 50-minute set and left everyone - regardless of gender or orientation - a little bit smitten.
Buenos Aires-based artist and Moviment d'Alliberament Digital organizer N|el Palazzo will host and introduce a selection of contemporary experimental animated films in which artists from England, Spain, Germany, Japan, the United States and Canada explore graphics, abstraction and synesthesia.
One of the things that helps make her such an effervescent live performer is that she suffers from the neurological condition synesthesia which, in her case, means she sees colours when she hears music.