synesthesia


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synesthesia

 [sin″es-the´zhah]
a secondary sensation accompanying an actual perception; the experiencing of a sensation in one place, due to stimulation applied to another place; also, the condition in which a stimulus of one sense is perceived as sensation of a different sense, as when a sound produces a sensation of color.

syn·es·the·si·a

(sin'es-thē'zē-ă),
1. A condition in which a stimulus, in addition to exciting the usual and normally located sensation, gives rise to a subjective sensation of different character or localization; for example, color hearing, color taste.
2. From a neurolinguistic perspective, stimulus-response conditioning such as seen in a phobia.
[syn- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]

synesthesia

/syn·es·the·sia/ (sin″es-the´zhah)
1. a secondary sensation accompanying an actual perception.
2. a dysesthesia in which a stimulus of one sense is perceived as sensation of a different sense, as when a sound produces a sensation of color.
3. a dysesthesia in which a stimulus to one part of the body is experienced as being at a different location.

synesthesia

also

synaesthesia

(sĭn′ĭs-thē′zhə)
n.
1. A condition in which one type of stimulation evokes the sensation of another, as when the hearing of a sound produces the visualization of a color.
2. A sensation felt in one part of the body as a result of stimulus applied to another, as in referred pain.
3. The description of one kind of sense impression by using words that normally describe another.

syn′es·thet′ic (-thĕt′ĭk) adj.

synesthesia

[sin′esthē′zhə]
a phenomenon in which sensations of two or more modalities accompany one another, as when a visual sensation is experienced when a particular sound is heard. Also called secondary sensation.

syn·es·the·si·a

(sin'es-thē'zē-ă)
A condition in which a stimulus, in addition to exciting the usual and normally located sensation, gives rise to a subjective sensation of different character or localization, e.g., color hearing, color taste.
Synonym(s): synaesthesia.
[syn- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]

syn·es·the·si·a

(sin'es-thē'zē-ă)
A condition in which a stimulus, in addition to exciting usual and normally located sensation, gives rise to a subjective sensation of different character.
Synonym(s): synaesthesia.
[syn- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]
References in periodicals archive ?
El Santon presents face-color synesthesia (the brain region responsible for face recognition is associated with the color-processing region); touch-mirror synesthesia (when the synesthete observes a person who is being touched or is experiencing pain, s/he experiences the same); high empathy (the ability to feel what other person is feeling), and schizotypy (certain personality traits in healthy people involving slight paranoia and delusions).
Representatives of Synesthesia randomly selected one contest winner from all correct responses.
Whatever the case, the new findings cast doubt on theories that dismiss synesthesia as the product of overactive imaginations and instead "lend such phenomena an authenticity beyond reasonable doubt," Gray's group says.
The Super Sensitive Black Beauty is a classic drum, and we have digitally sampled hits in every possible position," said Vince De Franco, Synesthesia founder and CEO, and inventor of the Mandala.
What this means (and the exhibition would have done well to say so) is both simple and momentous: The quest for synesthesia had moved from the level of reception to that of production.
The Mandala helps people find their rhythm - whether it's the beat of a drum, or of a sound they haven't yet created," said Vince De Franco, Synesthesia founder and CEO, and inventor of the Mandala.
The puns, sound effects, syntactic ambiguities, and synesthesia are marshaled among daring and often beautiful metaphors to produce highly polished mirrors of the natural world.
Katz wants to swear that there's absolutely no green paint mixed into his "dark gray," I'll concede that my perception was affected by a combination of gallery lighting and a little synesthesia from the title, Ada's Garden.
The artist has invented ways of picture making that induce synesthesia between sight and touch.
7) The idea of synesthesia is central to this esthetic; it' as though Olitski wanted to render the experience of color as some far more intimate and indefinite exchange than seeing alone affords--as flavor or scent, perhaps.
Perhaps because he holds so strictly to his sense of visuality as both the origin and destination of painting, Neher's work ends up reaffirming, instead, the blindness at the heart of vision as well as the synesthesia at its margin.
Their merger will generate a synesthesia of data experience, one that might finally establish the crucial relation between the phenomenological subject privileged by virtual reality and the acculturated, historical subject that grounds the hypertextual exploration.