synecology

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synecology

(sĭn′ĭ-kŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of the ecological interrelationships among communities of organisms.

syn′e·co·log′ic (-kə-lŏj′ĭk), syn′e·co·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

synecology

(sĭn″ē-kŏl′ō-jē) [Gr. syn, together, + oikos, house, + logos, word, reason]
The study of organisms in relationship to their environment in group form.

synecology

the study of communities, rather than individuals. Compare AUTECOLOGY.
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References in periodicals archive ?
1996; Quebec: Ministere des Ressources Naturelles, de la Faune et des Parcs, 2003), followed by subdivisions based on physiography and landscape patterns down to individual synecological types at increasingly larger scales of analysis.
It applies because the slow, sporadic, and spatially uneven accumulation of synecological data within a large geographical area often requires multiple iterations to develop a comprehensive classification.
Furthermore, from a synecological and phytogeographical perspective, this grasslands presents similarities with the Dactylo oceanicae-Daucetum gummiferi Gehu 2008 on the Atlantic cliffs of the Massif armoricain (Bretagne).
After this first selection (which in some cases may be extremely severe) the species are today responding to the requirements of the environment (where the concept of ecological environment cannot be dissasociated from the geographical environment) on the basis of their intrinsic traits (dispersal capacity, autoecological and synecological features etc.
Synecological analysis of the biotic community in microcosm.
indicates a synecological problem between these taxa of freshwater mussels and changes in North American rivers and streams (Johnson, 1978).
A general revision of these vegetation types is probably necessary, and would highlight the differences between these two worlds (Helianthemetea guttati and TheroBrometalia) which, in spite of several points in common, show a clear synecological distinction that should not be overlooked.
Hence, some of the factors that had been introduced when developing FORECE contribute little to the behavior of the model, but they may have reduced its generality without conveying clear advantages; the synecological "temperature indicator concept" (Ellenberg 1986) may serve as an example.