syndromic surveillance


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syndromic surveillance

Monitoring the health of a community by searching for specific signs or symptoms present in it. It is a public health strategy used to identify disease trends before they become epidemic, e.g. the first signs or symptoms of bioterrorism.
See also: surveillance
References in periodicals archive ?
This report describes the development of a syndromic surveillance cold weather syndrome for use in describing the direct impact of a winter storm on emergency department visits.
Fricker, Introduction to Statistical Methods for Biosurveillance: With an Emphasis on Syndromic Surveillance, Cambridge University Press, 2013.
Having noted variations in the operation and use of syndromic surveillance systems in Ontario, we obtained data collected during A(H1N1)pdm09 from federal, provincial and local syndromic surveillance systems as well as laboratory data from Public Health Ontario Laboratories (PHOL).
Syndromic surveillance of epidemics, cancer clusters and even bioterrorism from unstructured data in EHRs could help target resources to slow disease spread.
(28) The high sensitivity and low specificity of syndromic surveillance can complement the high specificity but low sensitivity of diagnostic microbiology.
* Public health informatics (applications of informatics principles and methods to areas such as "intelligent" decision support of public health agencies and practitioners, research in health behavior, health literacy, and syndromic surveillance)
Syndromic surveillance aimed at detecting influenzalike illness in emergency departments and clinics is being used in several cities, and the Centers for Disease Control plans to expand the use of syndromic surveillance to 300 clinical sites by the end of 2006.
Grouping or categorization of data can occur at either the site where reports are generated (eg, disease and nonbattle injury reports) or the archiving center (eg, for analysis or [automatically] using modern syndromic surveillance * programs).
Stoto's "Syndromic Surveillance" (Issues, Spring 2005) catalogues numerous reasons why these early warning systems for large outbreaks of disease will disappoint the thousands of U.S.
Because it cannot be diagnosed, the only reliable method for identification is through "syndromic surveillance," which is the ongoing analysis of signs and symptoms in a population.
One possible solution is "Syndromic Surveillance," a method being studied by the Denver (Colorado) Department of Public Health that monitors early symptoms of a bioterror attack.
Tenders are invited for seeking a vendor-hosted syndromic surveillance solution and related maintenance and support services.