syndemic


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syndemic

(sin″dem′ik) [ syn- + analogy with (en)demic, (epi)demic]
A network of health problems, esp. ones that share common social underpinnings and cause an increased public health burden on a community. An example of a syndemic is the linkage between the ready availability of snack foods, low socioeconomic status, sedentary lifestyle, overeating, obesity, and an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
SA's healthcare has the unique challenge of the HIV/tuberculosis syndemic intersecting with an increasing burden of non-communicable disease and trauma.
These efforts will require further collaboration among federal partners and state and local health departments to better address the syndemic of opioid abuse and HCV infection.
There is no doubt that Marshall's most recent book Drinking Smoke: The Tobacco Syndemic in Oceania will also become a classic.
A syndemic model of substance abuse, intimate partner violence, HIV infection, and mental health among Hispanics.
Participant narratives confirm the notion of HIV/HSV-2 coinfection as a syndemic whereby HIV and HSV-2 interact synergistically to create an excess burden of disease and health consequences (Singer & Clair, 2003).
Nowhere is this threat more pressing than in South Africa, where drug-resistant TB and HIV have converged in a deadly syndemic defined by increased incidences of TB and HIV (4), endemic transmission of drug-resistant TB strains (5), high mortality rates (6), and poor treatment outcomes (7).
Syndemic suffering; social distress, depression, and diabetes among Mexican immigrant women.
Syndemic theory argues a point that Villaronga himself posits, that these illnesses must be understood together, and new remedies must be found.
syndemic models) for the prevention and treatment for HIV; however, these models still need to be developed further to reflect the different states of knowledge of multiple factors at many levels of analysis that currently still exist in the field.
The final article in this special issue, "Arrest Histories of High-Risk Gay and Bisexual Men in Miami: Unexpected Additional Evidence for Syndemic Theory" by Kurtz, is not based on the NIDA CJ-DATS initiative, but nevertheless has relevance for the wider issues of HIV infection, drug abuse, and criminal justice involved populations.
Tuberculosis and HIV syndemic, California, 1993-2008.
Bivariate and multivariate logistic models were developed to predict both lifetime arrest and crime category (property, violent, drug and status crimes) by demographics and by measures of health disparities suggested by syndemic theory, including substance use, mental health distress, sex sensation seeking, and victimization.