syncytium


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Related to syncytium: syncytiotrophoblast

syncytium

 [sin-sish´e-um]
a multinucleate mass of protoplasm produced by the merging of cells. adj., adj syncyt´ial.

syn·cy·ti·um

, pl.

syn·cy·ti·a

(sin-si'shē-ŭm, -ă; -sit'ē-ŭm),
A multinucleated protoplasmic mass formed by the secondary union of originally separate cells.
[Mod. L. fr. syn- + G. kytos, cell]

syncytium

(sĭn-sĭsh′ē-əm)
n. pl. syn·cytia (-sĭsh′ē-ə)
A multinucleated mass of cytoplasm that is not separated into individual cells.

syn·cy′ti·al (-sĭsh′ē-əl) adj.

syn·cy·ti·um

, pl. syncytia (sin-sish'ē-ŭm, -ă)
A multinucleated protoplasmic mass formed by the secondary union of originally separate cells.
[Mod. L. fr. syn- + G. kytos, cell]

syncytium

a cellular structure containing many nuclei.
References in periodicals archive ?
cardiomyocyte syncytium may propagate to the Purkinje network, nerve
A syncytium typically comprises of around 200 cells with many nuclei and enormous hypertrophy of the syncytial elements, which leads to an enlargement of the feeding site, usually the region nearest to the head of the nematode (Fig.
In the terminal villi we observed focal stromal edema, capillary angiomatosis, and thinning of syncytium.
Perhaps it was a communal entity or a megametaorganism in the sense of a modern syncytium (the result of multiple cell fusions) and a modern coenocyte (the result of multiple cell divisions).
The outer syncytium of the worm lacked nuclei, which were below the surface.
--osteocytes are found in the bone at the level of the mineralized matrix, connected by their extensions, among themselves and with bone lining cells, therewith forming the so-called osteocyte syncytium representing the receptor organ for the mechanical forces which, by acting on the bone, determine the initiation of the remodelling process.
NB-2 and NB-64 are "drug-like" molecules and significantly inhibit HIV-1 mediated syncytium formation and the six-helix bundle formation between NHR and CHR.
Underlying the basal cuticle was the hypodermal tissue, which, for the most part in a healthy worm, consisted of a single large syncytium, in which the internal architectures were clear, compact, and well organized (Figure 3(c)).