syncytia


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Related to syncytia: syncytial, croup

syncytia

See syncytium.

syncytium

(sin-sish'(e-)um) (sin-sish'(e-)a) plural.syncytia [ syn- + cyto- + -ium (2)]
1. A multinucleated mass of protoplasm such as a striated muscle fiber.
2. A group of cells in which the protoplasm of one cell is continuous with that of adjoining cells such as the mesenchyme cells of the embryo. See: coenocyte
References in periodicals archive ?
After arriving at the root vascular bundle, nematodes induce an initial syncytial cell (ISC) to initiate specialized feeding structures, which are called syncytia (singular; syncytium).
He also argues that syncytia may explain some of the ravages of AIDS, even accounting, at least in part, for the immune system decline seen in people infected with HIV.
Host cell responses to endoparasitic nematode at- tack: structure and function of giant cells and syncytia.
Syncytia are multinucleated masses of protoplasm formed by the fusion of cells.
Cocultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients 1-4 with normal PBMC and/or lymphoid cell lines were negative for cytopathicity, syncytia, and the generation of reverse transcriptase activity as measured by standard methods.
Cells infected with both mycoplasmas and HIV did not clump together to form giant, unhealthy cells called syncytia, as did those infected with HIV alone.
SPC3 blocks HIV-1 and HIV-2 induced syncytia formation.
There are minor misprints, such as the misspelling of cayatenensis, the use of syncytia (instead of syncytial), Amoeba (rather than Entamoeba) and humeral (instead of humoral).
It happens because in susceptible cultivars,nematodes depend entirely on functional syncytia to acquire nutrients to develop into reproductive adult males or females.
The virus induced polykaryocytosis, which is characterized by the formation of large syncytia with nuclear and cytoplasmic vacuolation, a phenomenon that is not reported in mammalian cells infected with other arboviruses.
We start to see that the cells form syncytia as we don't really know where one cell ends and the other begins.
The authors also say they disagree with current scientific opinion that the rupture of infected cells may depend on the presence of syncytia -- giant cells formed when lymphocytes clump around an infected cell and their membranes fuse.