syncope


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syncope

 [sing´kah-pe]
faint. adj. adj syn´copal, syncop´ic.
cardiac syncope sudden loss of consciousness, either with momentary premonitory symptoms or without warning, due to cerebral anemia caused by ventricular asystole, extreme bradycardia, or ventricular fibrillation.
laryngeal syncope tussive syncope.
neurocardiogenic syncope a particularly serious type of vasovagal attack; the etiology is unknown.
stretching syncope syncope associated with stretching the arms upward with the spine extended.
swallow syncope syncope associated with swallowing, a disorder of atrioventricular conduction mediated by the vagus nerve.
tussive syncope brief loss of consciousness associated with paroxysms of coughing.
vasovagal syncope vasovagal attack.

syn·co·pe

(sin'kŏ-pē),
Loss of consciousness and postural tone caused by diminished cerebral blood flow.
[G. synkopē, a cutting short, a swoon]

syncope

(sĭng′kə-pē, sĭn′-)
n.
1. Grammar The shortening of a word by omission of a sound, letter, or syllable from the middle of the word; for example, bos'n for boatswain.
2. Medicine A brief loss of consciousness caused by inadequate blood flow to the brain.

syn′co·pal (sĭng′kə-pəl, sĭn′-), syn·cop′ic (sĭn-kŏp′ĭk) adj.

syncope

Neurology A transient loss of consciousness not explained by other altered states of consciousness in the history of the Pt, often linked to cerebral ischemia; fainting, loss of conciousness or vertigo due to a transient arrhythmia, cardiac conduction–heart block, or neurovascular tone. See Carotid sinus syncope, Deglutition syncope, Neurocardiogenic syncope, Seder syncope, Seinfeld syncope, Sushi syncope.

syn·co·pe

(sing'kŏ-pē)
Loss of consciousness and postural tone caused by diminished cerebral blood flow.
[G. synkopē, cutting short]

syncope

Fainting.

Syncope

A loss of consciousness over a short period of time, caused by a temporary lack of oxygen in the brain.
Mentioned in: Tilt Table Test

syn·co·pe

(sing'kŏ-pē)
Loss of consciousness and postural tone due to diminished cerebral blood flow.
[G. synkopē, cutting short]

Patient discussion about syncope

Q. i am 12 and my hair is falling out what do i do? there is like a hair ball in my tub

A. First of all you are going through puberty and the hormonal levels in your body are changing, this could cause accelerated hair loss that will go away. However, if you feel like you are having severe hair loss you should go and get blood tests for the evaluation of several vitamin defficiencies (B12, Folic acid and Iron), that can be the reason. Soemtimes a lack in our nutrition can be the reason for losing hair.

Q. I found out 1week ago i was 6wks pregnant and lastnight i passed a 1/2dollar size clear ball did i miscarrie? the ball was clear,soft and jellie like and it came w/a lot of blood but i didnt see no signs of a baby or anything like that

A. Possibly, but not essentially. In this age the embryo is quite small (several millimeters), so you may easily mistaken it. My best advice is to consult a doctor (e.g. gynecologist) so an US or other test can be done to accurately diagnose a miscarriage.

Take care,

More discussions about syncope
References in periodicals archive ?
Baseline characteristics for the two types of syncope. Vasovagal (n=52) Cardiogenic (n=92) P Age (mean 68.4 [+ or -] 13 68.6 [+ or -] 13 0.94 [+ or -] SD) Female gender 26 (50) 33 (35.9) 0.098 Hypertension 47 (91.2) 82 (89.1) 0.81 Diabetes 11 (21.2) 20 (21.7) 0.59 Smoking 11 (21.2) 26 (28.3) 0.35 Previous stroke 4 (7.7) 7 (8.0) 0.83 Aortic stenosis 5 (8.8) 15 (17.2) 0.31 Heart failure 7 (13.5) 20 (21.7) 0.22 Abnormal EKG 29 (55.8) 70 (76.1) 0.015 EF <35% 2 (4.5) 16 (18.4) 0.095 Prodromes 32 (45) 40 (43.5) 0.56 Hospitalization 17 (32.7) 87 (94.6) <0.001 Death 7 (13.5) 7 (7.6) 0.38 Data are reported as number and percent (chi-squared test).
Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness that the patient rapidly recovers from.1 Patients with syncope commonly visit emergency departments due to the sudden onset.
The guidelines recommend to extend its use for diagnosis in patients with unexplained falls, suspected epilepsy, or recurrent episodes of unexplained syncope and a low risk of sudden cardiac death.
This case highlights the importance of considering consider malignant cardiac arrhythmias in patients presenting with syncope and seizures.
This case was written to report an atypical presentation of PE-induced syncope due to an occult malignancy in an unsuspecting elderly female patient.
This is an "instantaneous SE" and is also associated with syncope, including tilt-positive patients [8].
Overall, this case illustrates the importance of maintaining a high degree of suspicion when assessing for cardiac etiologies, including considering the use of provocative maneuvers or multimodality cardiac imaging, in patients with otherwise presumed typical POTS and vasovagal syncope. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of obstructive cardiomyopathy without severe septal hypertrophy with abnormalities in papillary muscle and chordal attachment, in a patient diagnosed with POTS and vasovagal syncope.
This study showed that LAEF was decreased in patients with vasovagal syncope. LAEF is defined as the force generated by the LA to expel the blood through the mitral valve during atrial systole (5).
Conditions that affect the brain vessels in childhood including vertebrobasilar artery failure, subclavian steal syndrome, migraine, Moyamoya disease, and Takayasu disease are the causes of cerebrovascular syncope (29).
The first challenge in our case was to determine the cause of the recurrent episodes of syncope. The most frequent cause of loss of consciousness is neurally mediated (reflex) syncope, with cardiovascular syncope cited as the second most frequent etiology [4].