synchrotron

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syn·chro·tron

(sin'krō-tron),
A machine for generating high-speed electrons or protons, as for nuclear studies.

synchrotron

A cyclotron which accelerates electrons via a pulsating magnetic field, imparting up to 20 MeV of energy. The first medical betatron was opened in the 1950s, but were limited by the low attainable strength of the magnetic field and the size of the magnetic core.

synchrotron

(sĭng′kră-trŏn″)
A particle accelerator used in medical imaging that accelerates positively or negatively charged particles.
References in periodicals archive ?
The scientists used synchrotron laminography, a recent imaging technique specially developed for studying large, flat samples.
The football-field-size machine, called a synchrotron, uses tubes, magnets, vacuum pumps, and other gadgetry to produce intensely powerful beams of light.
Dr Jeff Church from CSIRO plans to use the synchrotron to combat the Devil Facial Tumour Disease--a horrific facial tumour that has killed thousands of devils.
"But I doubt you will ever see a synchrotron at an airport scanning your luggage."
When the CLS project was launched, only a handful of Saskatchewan researchers used synchrotrons. This group has grown to about 80 at the University of Saskatchewan alone.
The NCI is interested in how the synchrotron facilities might advance the study of cancer at the molecular level.
Excitement is starting to build now that the $174 million Canadian Light Source [CLS] synchrotron is less than a year from completion and has recruited a world-class synchrotron scientist to lead it.
For example, IR imaging on biological and industrial samples can be performed now at synchrotrons with 3 to 5 [micro]m resolution compared to 30 [micro]m available with a laboratory source.