synaesthesia

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Related to synaesthetic: synesthetic, synaesthesia, Synæsthesia

synaesthesia

(sĭn′ĭs-thē′zhə)
n.
Variant of synesthesia.

syn·es·the·si·a

(sin'es-thē'zē-ă)
A condition in which a stimulus, in addition to exciting the usual and normally located sensation, gives rise to a subjective sensation of different character or localization, e.g., color hearing, color taste.
Synonym(s): synaesthesia.
[syn- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]

synaesthesia

The phenomenon in which stimulations of one sense modality produces the effect of stimulation of another. Thus, a person may consistently experience a particular letter of the alphabet, or a musical tone, as a particular colour.

synaesthesia 

Phenomenon in which the stimulation of one of the senses produces a response from another sensory modality. Example: seeing the colour red when a particular sound is heard. See modality.

syn·es·the·si·a

(sin'es-thē'zē-ă)
A condition in which a stimulus, in addition to exciting usual and normally located sensation, gives rise to a subjective sensation of different character.
Synonym(s): synaesthesia.
[syn- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]
References in periodicals archive ?
However, James' focus on synaesthetic imagination in Indigenous artistic practice resonates with Jennifer Biddle's book Bodies, Breast, Canvas: Central desert art as experience (UNSW Press 2007), which examines the multi-layered connections between canvas, country and bodies through the lens of touch and affect.
There is a synaesthetic quality to North's description, in other words, as the total production, in all its visual and auditory splendor, is to be enjoyed by the ear.
the horns' low lament, synaesthetic sludge it was .
Vittorini's Synaesthetic Use of Acoustic Imagery in Conversazione in Sicilia.
Thanks to crosses in one dimension, to arch and vault in another, and to the mutually mirroring relation of inside and outside in both dimensions, keel, kirk, and work become synaesthetic and multiplanar figures for each other: the components, we may say, of a complex (Coleridgean) symbol.
In Carnal Thoughts, Sobchack goes further and very closely outlines an approach that highlights the experience of film as a synaesthetic experience: "'We see and comprehend and feel films with our entire bodily being, informed by the full history and carnal knowledge of our acculturated sensorium" (2004, 63).
The article argues that Krog endows the poetic tongue with particular capacities for synaesthetic perception and for modes of imagining that surrender many of the limffations we ascribe to other registers and grammars.
Crossbreeding the synaesthetic with the kinesthetic fuses the etymology and phonetics of "cinema," derived from the Greek, kinema: meaning motion.
An artist with such unusual powers of synaesthetic perception as those of Bob Dylan can, through his work, reinstate the buried link between historical memory and myth.
The arts, including literature, also make important use of synaesthetic effects that engage all the senses.
This passage reveals a sensuality surrounding the experience of food; the synaesthetic anticipation of enjoying the pheasant signifies, for Susan, a pure moment of being.
Next, 'white' is used to describe the imagined state of the speaker after the 'burn(ing)' effect of sexual gratification, and to represent the synaesthetic collapse of the mental and the visual in 'wills and words all white'.